curio 6: think knit

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By curio
Knitwear can conjure a quaint image of old ladies stitching and bitching, but in reality it’s a sophisticated, tactile art form. Sculpture meets engineering.

Art Direction and Styling by Studio Marcus Hay, Inc.

 Photography by Kate Mathis 

Words by Kirsty Munro

A pair of red socks that sits inLondon’s Victoria & Albert Museum are one of the earliest known examples of knitwear. An ancient art form, that some believe may have originated from the practice of knotting fishing nets. Driven through the 1400’s by the male fashion for fitted socks, it was eventually snapped up by designers like Coco Chanel andSonia Rykiel who celebrated knit for the way it moulds perfectly to the body without constriction. 

Of all the fashion disciplines,knit seems the most magical. It enables us to conjure something almost out of thin air, creating a textile and controlling the process. This Curio is a celebration of knitwear - a fashion technique, an art form, a method of meditation. 

We look at how it has evolved,and why over a thousand years later we are still reaching for our favorite knit when the weather turns cold.

Read Issue 6, Think Knit, at www.curio.work.

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