Are You Allergic to Bad Interior Design?

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By Katie la Kapro / Published by Katie la Kapro
We’ve all seen interior design that almost brings us to the point of being ill. Maybe bad design does cause allergic reactions?

All jokes aside, the interior design of your home could actually make you sick. Millions of people suffer from allergies, and the way you design your home can trigger symptoms. 

 On top of that, there are many things in houses that contain chemicals that adversely affect you too. This is despite laws and bills that have been passed banning some of these substances. A good sense of style isn’t just easy on the eyes, it’s easy on your allergies and health too. Plus, who wouldn’t want a good excuse for a home makeover? 

 There are plenty of stylistic choices that can be giving your sinuses a run for their money instead of adding value to your home. So if allergies are already kicking your butt, it’s time to take a good look at your home and see if you’re allergic to your interior design. 

Floors

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Alter and the residents chose to utilize ipe, an ultra-durable Brazilian hardwood, for the interior flooring and second-story exterior paneling. The wood, so dense that it must be drilled and screwed rather than nailed, often comes in an unpredictable array of color shades, evident in the floor’s natural pattern.

Alter and the residents chose to utilize ipe, an ultra-durable Brazilian hardwood, for the interior flooring and second-story exterior paneling. The wood, so dense that it must be drilled and screwed rather than nailed, often comes in an unpredictable array of color shades, evident in the floor’s natural pattern.

Although carpeting might feel good on your feet, your allergies will not be thanking you. Dust and mold love to find homes in carpet, and rodents and insects are known to leave allergy-inducing surprises behind as well. Instead, opt for beautiful hardwood floors or chic linoleum flooring. 

 Who doesn’t like the look of natural wood, and linoleum comes in an assortment of styles that would make even the pickiest interior designer happy. However, if you feel like you’ll miss the feel of carpet too much, purchase a washable, ornate rug that will give any room the finishing touch it needs without the allergies you don’t. 

Walls

In Situ Design and Lilian B Interiors adapted a six-story brownstone in midtown Manhattan into a boutique hotel with 33 guest suites. Each floor received what the designers call a "visceral" color treatment using Benjamin Moore paints, including Outrageous Orange.

In Situ Design and Lilian B Interiors adapted a six-story brownstone in midtown Manhattan into a boutique hotel with 33 guest suites. Each floor received what the designers call a "visceral" color treatment using Benjamin Moore paints, including Outrageous Orange.

Sometimes you want to give your walls a fresh coat of paint just to shake things up a bit. However, there will be times when you should actually repaint your home to ease your allergies. Mold can be a concern if you live in humid climates, making mold-resistant paint a must. 

 So take this opportunity to try out that daring color you were always afraid to use and reap the benefits of a spectacular color palette and an allergy-free home. Curtains and blinds can also be a magnet for allergens such as dust mites, pollen, and mold. 

 Get some easier to clean roller blinds or new curtains made out of washable cotton or synthetic material to match your new paint job. Shades are also a great option to consider. 

Bedroom

A COZY AND MODERN INDOOR-OUTDOOR BEDROOM IN BUENOS AIRES<br><br>In Argentinean architect and furniture designer Alejandro Sticotti's bedroom, dappled sunlight and reclaimed-wood floors and walls give the room a warm, peaceful feel.

A COZY AND MODERN INDOOR-OUTDOOR BEDROOM IN BUENOS AIRES

In Argentinean architect and furniture designer Alejandro Sticotti's bedroom, dappled sunlight and reclaimed-wood floors and walls give the room a warm, peaceful feel.

Our bedroom, to many of us, is our sanctuary. It’s a place where we go to unwind and recharge for a new day. However, allergies can get in the way of that and make us feel more tired and sick than rejuvenated. 

 Bedrooms can be havens for all sorts of allergens. To combat this, use stylish allergen-proof covers on your pillows, mattress, and box spring. Although feathered bedding and wool blankets keep you warm, they’re also serious irritants. 

 Even consider investing in an organic mattress. Mattresses can contain all sorts of chemicals that can aggravate your sinuses and your overall health. Organic mattresses are made of more natural materials that will ease the burden on your body. 

Furniture

Most of the home’s furniture was purchased at Restoration Hardware, Circa Modern, or antique shops. "We both love the midcentury designs that we grew up with," Bronee says. "We wanted furniture that was authentic to us and our personal styles while also fitting into a Catskills hideaway barn."

Most of the home’s furniture was purchased at Restoration Hardware, Circa Modern, or antique shops. "We both love the midcentury designs that we grew up with," Bronee says. "We wanted furniture that was authentic to us and our personal styles while also fitting into a Catskills hideaway barn."

Purchasing new furniture is one of the many things people forget to consider when moving to a new home. You may have old chairs and sofas you can use from your other house, but they can be a major source for allergies too. So even though new furniture comes at at cost, it can fit the style of your interior design much better while also alleviating itchy eyes and runny noses. 

 Also, sticking to a regular cleaning schedule is by far one of the best things you can do to remove allergens from your home.That being said, make sure to choose furniture that’s easy to clean. Materials such as wood, leather, and metal are not only fashionable, but can be wiped down in seconds. Try to steer clear from dust-producing upholstered furniture as well. 

Clutter

The architects designed a tall unit of closets and open storage to minimize clutter but also echo traditional Japanese architecture—an open plan with no floor-to-ceiling inner walls.

The architects designed a tall unit of closets and open storage to minimize clutter but also echo traditional Japanese architecture—an open plan with no floor-to-ceiling inner walls.

Clutter is never in style. However, it’s a natural part of life and our homes will be messy from time to time. If you’re an allergy sufferer, there’s no better time than now to get organized. Items such as toys, stacks of papers, knick knacks, and magazines can collect dust when scattered throughout your home. 

 Dust does no favors to your sinuses, so it’s best to put these things away in drawers or shelves. Anything you don’t need or use should be thrown away or donated. Having less clutter will make cleaning your home of irritants much easier as well. 

 Whether you’re really allergic to bad interior design or not, it’s a good idea to redesign your home with allergy sufferers in mind. Your friends and families will appreciate it, and so will you if you’re susceptible to hay fever now or perhaps in the future. By following these tips, you’ll have people going, "Ooh" instead of "Achoo!" That’s truly the power of design.