A Renovated Midcentury in San Diego Is Sharp and Sustainable

Add to
Like
Share
By Jennifer Baum Lagdameo
Danish architect Jesper Pedersen reimagines a Lloyd Ruocco midcentury, putting sustainability at the forefront of the Scandinavian-inspired design.

In 2015, when Danish architect Jesper Pedersen of DNA Design Group was commissioned to work on this midcentury Point Loma home in San Diego, California, his primary intent was to bring it into the present while embracing the spirit and integrity of the classic property's original design. Pederson planned to reconstruct the home—built in 1950 by San Diego’s first modern architect, Lloyd Ruocco—and take advantage of the eco-friendly and sustainable building materials that were not available when it was originally constructed.

Newsletter
Join the Daily Dose Mailing List

Get carefully curated content filled with inspiring homes from around the world, innovative new products, and the best in modern design

Pedersen was thrilled to be able to keep the home's floor-to-ceiling glass walls—a feature not possible with new construction because of the Title 24 restrictions. 

Pedersen was thrilled to be able to keep the home's floor-to-ceiling glass walls—a feature not possible with new construction because of the Title 24 restrictions. 

Using "50 shades of white" and walnut as his starting points, Pedersen was able to soften the overall look of the home and pay homage to Ruocco’s use of wood from the original design. "I thought of it as deconstructing a classic dish and reconstructing it into something even better for the times," explains Pedersen. The architect's Scandinavian heritage also played a major role in his aesthetic choices with the use of clean minimalistic lines, classic Danish furniture, natural leathers, and muted tones echoing throughout the home.

A new floor plan opened up the home, taking advantage of both natural lighting and cross-ventilation—minimizing the need for electricity and air-conditioning. The home's energy-efficient metal roof adds to the beauty and sustainability of the home. 

A new floor plan opened up the home, taking advantage of both natural lighting and cross-ventilation—minimizing the need for electricity and air-conditioning. The home's energy-efficient metal roof adds to the beauty and sustainability of the home. 

Pedersen locally sourced the El Dorado tile arranged in a 3D pattern for the fireplace and entrance wall.

Pedersen locally sourced the El Dorado tile arranged in a 3D pattern for the fireplace and entrance wall.

The walls of glass create a seamless flow—integrating the home into its surroundings. 

The walls of glass create a seamless flow—integrating the home into its surroundings. 

The living room features stunning views of the infinity pool and beyond. 

The living room features stunning views of the infinity pool and beyond. 

"The kitchen was tucked away in the back of the house, as we used to see kitchens designed, and in this case without proper ventilation or lighting," explained Pedersen. "I brought the kitchen out to take advantage of all of the elements—lighting, air flow, and the extraordinary view."

"The kitchen was tucked away in the back of the house, as we used to see kitchens designed, and in this case without proper ventilation or lighting," explained Pedersen. "I brought the kitchen out to take advantage of all of the elements—lighting, air flow, and the extraordinary view."

The open kitchen/dining room is bright and airy. 

The open kitchen/dining room is bright and airy. 

Aster Cucine’s eco-friendly cabinetry from Italy was chosen along with high-end, efficient appliances and fixtures.

Aster Cucine’s eco-friendly cabinetry from Italy was chosen along with high-end, efficient appliances and fixtures.

The airy open feel extends to the master suite. 

The airy open feel extends to the master suite. 

Low-emission, 45-inch by 60-inch Italian ceramic floor tiles were used throughout. 

Low-emission, 45-inch by 60-inch Italian ceramic floor tiles were used throughout. 

The master bath. 

The master bath. 

Low-irrigation plants and minimalistic hardscapes form the serene outdoor space. 

Low-irrigation plants and minimalistic hardscapes form the serene outdoor space. 

The infinity pool overlooks stunning views of Mexico and the San Diego skyline and harbor. 

The infinity pool overlooks stunning views of Mexico and the San Diego skyline and harbor. 

Project Credits

Architect of Record: DNA Design Group, Jesper Pedersen
General Contractor: GDC Construction
Architectural Planning Firm: Techne
Design Landscape Architect: Grounded
Lighting Designer: Tazz Lighting
Kitchen and Cabinetry: Aster Cucine