A Forest Sanctuary Designed to Support Autistic Triplets, Their Parents, and a Host of Caregivers

A Forest Sanctuary Designed to Support Autistic Triplets, Their Parents, and a Host of Caregivers

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By Kelly Vencill Sanchez / Photos by Matthew Williams
Architectural harmony defines a family’s home near Lake Tahoe.

Ever since the birth of Amy and Nick Bancroft’s triplets six years ago, the couple’s lives have been a whirlwind of activity. But when their son and two daughters were diagnosed with autism four years ago, things shifted into overdrive, and the family’s home, near Truckee, California, became a de facto therapy center, with a stream of professionals cycling through daily to provide specialized interventions. The Bancrofts didn’t just need a place for themselves, they needed their home to be a home. "During the week, we’d have up to a dozen people at the house," says Nick. "We figured out quickly that we needed separate areas for kids and therapists, and areas off-limits to them during therapy so that Amy and I would have privacy."  

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