<span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">Inspired by the works of American light-installation artist James Turrell, Tin House by Henning Stummel Architects is a well-considered design that makes the most out of space and light.</span>
Inspired by the works of American light-installation artist James Turrell, Tin House by Henning Stummel Architects is a well-considered design that makes the most out of space and light.
When a Manhattan family approached Frame Design Lab to create a more private master bedroom, they imagined the firm would simply rework a few closet walls. Instead, partners Nina Cook John and Anne-Marie Singer proposed a bold plan to divide the space by adding a 60-square-foot unit in the middle of the floor plan to reorganize the flow.
When a Manhattan family approached Frame Design Lab to create a more private master bedroom, they imagined the firm would simply rework a few closet walls. Instead, partners Nina Cook John and Anne-Marie Singer proposed a bold plan to divide the space by adding a 60-square-foot unit in the middle of the floor plan to reorganize the flow.
"In the kitchen, we changed the layout," Davison says. "It was a galley kitchen, extending lengthways into the room. We spun it back along the back wall. The tiles are Moroccan concrete tiles that came from a supplier here in Manhattan. The idea was to inject some color and playfulness into the space with the blue cabinetry." Photo by Alan Gastelum.
"In the kitchen, we changed the layout," Davison says. "It was a galley kitchen, extending lengthways into the room. We spun it back along the back wall. The tiles are Moroccan concrete tiles that came from a supplier here in Manhattan. The idea was to inject some color and playfulness into the space with the blue cabinetry." Photo by Alan Gastelum.
Abbes and Davison removed drywall to expose the brick on one wall in the living room. "As we began to expose that brick, we found the old metal framing that they used to use," Daivson says. "They used to stick chicken-mesh wire on it and put plaster on top. When we exposed the brick, we found this metal detail and decided to keep it." Photo by Alan Gastelum.
Abbes and Davison removed drywall to expose the brick on one wall in the living room. "As we began to expose that brick, we found the old metal framing that they used to use," Daivson says. "They used to stick chicken-mesh wire on it and put plaster on top. When we exposed the brick, we found this metal detail and decided to keep it." Photo by Alan Gastelum.
The New Project Group renovated a cramped, uninviting space on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. The company gave the 400-square-foot apartment a gut renovation, with a new kitchen and bathroom designed for efficiency. A parallelogram-shaped window pane, rescued from an architectural salvage yard, was outfitted with steel edges and casters, and repurposed as a coffee table.
The New Project Group renovated a cramped, uninviting space on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. The company gave the 400-square-foot apartment a gut renovation, with a new kitchen and bathroom designed for efficiency. A parallelogram-shaped window pane, rescued from an architectural salvage yard, was outfitted with steel edges and casters, and repurposed as a coffee table.
A dining area occupies a space between the living room and media room. Photo by Francis Dzikowski/ESTO.
A dining area occupies a space between the living room and media room. Photo by Francis Dzikowski/ESTO.
The renovated apartment has a brighter, more open feel than it did previously. Photo by Francis Dzikowski/ESTO.
The renovated apartment has a brighter, more open feel than it did previously. Photo by Francis Dzikowski/ESTO.
The couple retained the strongest architectural aspects of the house, such as the existing arch in the hall, and did away with others, such as a previous kitchen renovation.
The couple retained the strongest architectural aspects of the house, such as the existing arch in the hall, and did away with others, such as a previous kitchen renovation.
The ornate facade of the Art Nouveau building carries over into the entrance. The floral pattern of the original tile floor begins in the entrance hall and continues throughout the apartment; it is offset by a sleek iron table from Minim.
The ornate facade of the Art Nouveau building carries over into the entrance. The floral pattern of the original tile floor begins in the entrance hall and continues throughout the apartment; it is offset by a sleek iron table from Minim.
In the main bathroom, Art Deco crown molding reminds residents of the house’s past. New fixtures include white laminate cabinets and sinks and faucets by Roger Seller.
In the main bathroom, Art Deco crown molding reminds residents of the house’s past. New fixtures include white laminate cabinets and sinks and faucets by Roger Seller.
Reclaimed oak with a custom finish by LV Wood surrounds a staircase in a herringbone pattern. The new stairs are painted off black by Farrow & Ball, and the handrail that lines them is of salvaged mahogany.
Reclaimed oak with a custom finish by LV Wood surrounds a staircase in a herringbone pattern. The new stairs are painted off black by Farrow & Ball, and the handrail that lines them is of salvaged mahogany.
As much as the owners and Roberts wanted – and needed – to modernize the home, they also tried to honor some of its historical touches. They preserved the mantel, and replaced the plaster crowns on the parlor level. The antique chaise is by Lisa Sherman, and the walls are painted pavilion gray by Farrow & Ball.
As much as the owners and Roberts wanted – and needed – to modernize the home, they also tried to honor some of its historical touches. They preserved the mantel, and replaced the plaster crowns on the parlor level. The antique chaise is by Lisa Sherman, and the walls are painted pavilion gray by Farrow & Ball.
Onwers Alex Gil and Claudia DeSimio reconfigured the space inside their 2,000-square-foot duplex, creating one open area to hold a monolithic "wedge core" to house the staircase. "The older the building, the more you can adhere to older codes, which gives you more liberty," says Gil, who heads the architecture firm Spacecutter.
Onwers Alex Gil and Claudia DeSimio reconfigured the space inside their 2,000-square-foot duplex, creating one open area to hold a monolithic "wedge core" to house the staircase. "The older the building, the more you can adhere to older codes, which gives you more liberty," says Gil, who heads the architecture firm Spacecutter.
Photo by Francis Dzikowski/ESTO.
Photo by Francis Dzikowski/ESTO.
An ample sill made of English elm was built into two front windows to create a gathering spot that is visually connected to the street. Donna Wilson’s lively Ernest pouf in coral Nos Da upholstery for SCP adds extra seating in the living room.
An ample sill made of English elm was built into two front windows to create a gathering spot that is visually connected to the street. Donna Wilson’s lively Ernest pouf in coral Nos Da upholstery for SCP adds extra seating in the living room.
The Torroja pendant light by David Weeks hangs in the dining area, standing in sharp relief to the home’s original brick, now painted white (in Benjamin Moore Paper White)along with the wooden floorboards (in Benjamin Moore Revere Pewter). Radiant heat underfoot means a toasty interior even without a surfeit of textiles. Photo by Matthew Williams.
The Torroja pendant light by David Weeks hangs in the dining area, standing in sharp relief to the home’s original brick, now painted white (in Benjamin Moore Paper White)along with the wooden floorboards (in Benjamin Moore Revere Pewter). Radiant heat underfoot means a toasty interior even without a surfeit of textiles. Photo by Matthew Williams.
The living room as it appeared before the renovation. Photo courtesy of Ed Kopel.
The living room as it appeared before the renovation. Photo courtesy of Ed Kopel.
Four bedrooms make up the private areas of the home, which all benefit from natural light and a complementary airy design. Custom built-in shelves and a walkthrough closet with enclosed cabinets are featured in this room, as well as bedding by Coyuchi.
Four bedrooms make up the private areas of the home, which all benefit from natural light and a complementary airy design. Custom built-in shelves and a walkthrough closet with enclosed cabinets are featured in this room, as well as bedding by Coyuchi.
The bedroom is tucked in the back of the residence and doesn’t receive a lot of natural light. The couple emphasized the coziness of the space by painting the walls in Space Black from Benjamin Moore and selecting an oversize artwork, Flotar, 2011, by Christian Curiel. The bed is a Louis XV–style reproduction, approximately from the 1950s, that Gil and DeSimio found on eBay.
The bedroom is tucked in the back of the residence and doesn’t receive a lot of natural light. The couple emphasized the coziness of the space by painting the walls in Space Black from Benjamin Moore and selecting an oversize artwork, Flotar, 2011, by Christian Curiel. The bed is a Louis XV–style reproduction, approximately from the 1950s, that Gil and DeSimio found on eBay.
In the downstairs den, the mirrors facets of a West Elm side table refract the linearity of the moulding and hardwood flooring. Removing dated carpeting and vinyl tiles throughout, the couple unearthed and preserved the original wood floor, then sanded, twice bleached, whitewashed, and sealed it to achieve a neutral gray finish.
In the downstairs den, the mirrors facets of a West Elm side table refract the linearity of the moulding and hardwood flooring. Removing dated carpeting and vinyl tiles throughout, the couple unearthed and preserved the original wood floor, then sanded, twice bleached, whitewashed, and sealed it to achieve a neutral gray finish.
After restoring and renovating the interior of their four-story brownstone in Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood, Jeff Madalena and Jason Gnewikow—creative entrepreneurs and self-described interiors obsessives—outfitted the historic 1910 space with a minimal black-and-white palette, down to the stair railing and original moulding and wainscoting. Sparse, modern pieces—like a two-pronged sconce they designed for the parlor-floor landing and a Cy Twombly print in the adjacent family room—provide elegant counterpoints to the architecture.
After restoring and renovating the interior of their four-story brownstone in Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood, Jeff Madalena and Jason Gnewikow—creative entrepreneurs and self-described interiors obsessives—outfitted the historic 1910 space with a minimal black-and-white palette, down to the stair railing and original moulding and wainscoting. Sparse, modern pieces—like a two-pronged sconce they designed for the parlor-floor landing and a Cy Twombly print in the adjacent family room—provide elegant counterpoints to the architecture.
The Webster House is located in Chicago’s Lincoln Park neighborhood. A modern renovation of a historic two-story brownstone, our design celebrates the connection between old and new. 
#interior #brick #fireplace #chicago #websterhouse #hufft

Photo credit by Mike Sinclair
The Webster House is located in Chicago’s Lincoln Park neighborhood. A modern renovation of a historic two-story brownstone, our design celebrates the connection between old and new. #interior #brick #fireplace #chicago #websterhouse #hufft Photo credit by Mike Sinclair
A detail of a wall illustrates Benedetta's eye for pattern and texture.
A detail of a wall illustrates Benedetta's eye for pattern and texture.
The tin panels lining the stairs are original to the house.
The tin panels lining the stairs are original to the house.
A narrow hallway, typical of prewar apartments, doubles as an art gallery lined with woodcut type studies by graphic artist Jack Stauffacher, type sketches by Erik Spiekermann, and photography by Catherine Opie and Catherine Ledner.
A narrow hallway, typical of prewar apartments, doubles as an art gallery lined with woodcut type studies by graphic artist Jack Stauffacher, type sketches by Erik Spiekermann, and photography by Catherine Opie and Catherine Ledner.
Homeowners Cecilia Tham and Yoel Karaso renovate their home in Barcelona, harmoniously overlapping elements of the old and the new. Photo by: Gunnar Knechtel
Homeowners Cecilia Tham and Yoel Karaso renovate their home in Barcelona, harmoniously overlapping elements of the old and the new. Photo by: Gunnar Knechtel
This 130m2 flat in the center of Barcelona was in a very bad state when Hana, a young Egyptian artist bought it. We did a total renovation, tore down the bathrooms, the kitchen, a few walls, we opened the space to light, we kept what was precious from the past such as the original flooring, we discovered the typical catalan brick arches under suspended ceilings that we had restored. In a matter of 6 months the Flat was totally transformed into a beautiful 4 room, 3 bathroom, 2 patio apartment ready to welcome tourists to visit Barcelona.
This 130m2 flat in the center of Barcelona was in a very bad state when Hana, a young Egyptian artist bought it. We did a total renovation, tore down the bathrooms, the kitchen, a few walls, we opened the space to light, we kept what was precious from the past such as the original flooring, we discovered the typical catalan brick arches under suspended ceilings that we had restored. In a matter of 6 months the Flat was totally transformed into a beautiful 4 room, 3 bathroom, 2 patio apartment ready to welcome tourists to visit Barcelona.
The front door hallway flooring features original turn-of-the-century floor tiles in this renovated first-floor apartment in Barcelona, Spain.
The front door hallway flooring features original turn-of-the-century floor tiles in this renovated first-floor apartment in Barcelona, Spain.
Clusters of housing with communal courtyards are placed along a strict grid pattern in Barcelona's Eixample district, shown here. Reprinted with permission from Overview by Benjamin Grant, copyright (c) 2016. Published by Amphoto Books, a division of Penguin Random House, Inc.
Images (c) 2016 by DigitalGlobe, Inc.
Clusters of housing with communal courtyards are placed along a strict grid pattern in Barcelona's Eixample district, shown here. Reprinted with permission from Overview by Benjamin Grant, copyright (c) 2016. Published by Amphoto Books, a division of Penguin Random House, Inc. Images (c) 2016 by DigitalGlobe, Inc.
Made to measure buffet and reading bench, pine wood, leather handles. Napoles street full of trees in the center of Barcelona, more pics on our website www.bloomintdesign.com
Made to measure buffet and reading bench, pine wood, leather handles. Napoles street full of trees in the center of Barcelona, more pics on our website www.bloomintdesign.com
In the living room of the Barcelona apartment designer Elina Vila D’Acosta-Calheiros shares with her husband, Ginés Gorriz, Arne Jacobsen Swan chairs join a sofa by Piero Lissoni for Living Divani. The cabinet is from Cappellini, as is the Marcel Wanders Big Shadow lamp.
In the living room of the Barcelona apartment designer Elina Vila D’Acosta-Calheiros shares with her husband, Ginés Gorriz, Arne Jacobsen Swan chairs join a sofa by Piero Lissoni for Living Divani. The cabinet is from Cappellini, as is the Marcel Wanders Big Shadow lamp.
“The color choice relied on intuition,” says Elizadle. “Wood was the perfect material, and great way to bridge old and new. It’s traditional and really Nordic, an inspiration from a trip to Stockholm a few years ago.”
“The color choice relied on intuition,” says Elizadle. “Wood was the perfect material, and great way to bridge old and new. It’s traditional and really Nordic, an inspiration from a trip to Stockholm a few years ago.”

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