Friday Finds 08.16.13

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August 16, 2013
Art is where the heart is. This week: meditative ink line drawings, temporary tattoos for adults, a continuously reconfigured staircase installation, and so much more. Click through to see the Dwell staff's top internet finds this week. Happy Friday!
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  Erika: The Endless StaircaseKeep an eye on the staircases. They like to change…. The Tate Modern will be getting its very own Hogwarts-style staircase as part of the London Design Festival, beginning September 13. Commissioned by the American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC) and designed in collaboration with dRMM de Rijke Marsh Morgan Architects and Arup, the Endless Staircase, which is meant to be continuously reconfigured, will live just outside the museum. The installation will be open to the public through October 10. Image by Cityscape.

    Erika: The Endless Staircase

    Keep an eye on the staircases. They like to change…. The Tate Modern will be getting its very own Hogwarts-style staircase as part of the London Design Festival, beginning September 13. Commissioned by the American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC) and designed in collaboration with dRMM de Rijke Marsh Morgan Architects and Arup, the Endless Staircase, which is meant to be continuously reconfigured, will live just outside the museum. The installation will be open to the public through October 10. Image by Cityscape.

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  Megan: Each line one breath by John FranzenThere is an artist in the Netherlands that is hand-drawing thousands of lines with an ink pen over and over and over. In what might seem to some a maddening and tedious process, he creates beautiful works of art that move like liquid ripples or silk cloth in a breeze. For John Franzen this is a meditative process. As someone who knows what it is like to get into the trance of creating something I can see why he does it, what I can't wrap my head around is the back pain he must have. Watch this video to get an idea of this incredible artists work.

    Megan: Each line one breath by John Franzen

    There is an artist in the Netherlands that is hand-drawing thousands of lines with an ink pen over and over and over. In what might seem to some a maddening and tedious process, he creates beautiful works of art that move like liquid ripples or silk cloth in a breeze. For John Franzen this is a meditative process. As someone who knows what it is like to get into the trance of creating something I can see why he does it, what I can't wrap my head around is the back pain he must have. Watch this video to get an idea of this incredible artists work.

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  Diana: Utility Box Turned Optical IllusionA bit of public art for your Friday viewing pleasure: Muralist Mona Caron painted a utility box at the intersection of Church and Duboce in San Francisco to camouflage into its surroundings.

    Diana: Utility Box Turned Optical Illusion

    A bit of public art for your Friday viewing pleasure: Muralist Mona Caron painted a utility box at the intersection of Church and Duboce in San Francisco to camouflage into its surroundings.

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  Amanda: Rorschach by Esther LoboToday I happened upon Madrid-based photographer Esther Lobo's latest series called "Rorschach". As the name of the collection implies, interpretation is open to the viewer. Whether you see pelvises or butterflies (or something else buried deep in your subconscious), her collection of images have a texture and luminosity that make them lovely to behold. 

    AmandaRorschach by Esther Lobo

    Today I happened upon Madrid-based photographer Esther Lobo's latest series called "Rorschach". As the name of the collection implies, interpretation is open to the viewer. Whether you see pelvises or butterflies (or something else buried deep in your subconscious), her collection of images have a texture and luminosity that make them lovely to behold. 

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  Eujin: Pasolini and Fassbinder Retrospectives at BAM/PFACome September, my second home will be at the Berkeley Art Museum/Pacific Film Archive Theatre. Reason? Film auteurs Pier Paolo Pasolini and Rainer Werner Fassbinder are each being honored with career retrospectives. Pasolini starts from September 20-October 31 with Accattone (1961) and Fassbinder joins in on October 4-29 with Love Is Colder Than Death (1969). Bonus: Some films are newly restored 35mm prints!

    Eujin: Pasolini and Fassbinder Retrospectives at BAM/PFA

    Come September, my second home will be at the Berkeley Art Museum/Pacific Film Archive Theatre. Reason? Film auteurs Pier Paolo Pasolini and Rainer Werner Fassbinder are each being honored with career retrospectives. Pasolini starts from September 20-October 31 with Accattone (1961) and Fassbinder joins in on October 4-29 with Love Is Colder Than Death (1969). Bonus: Some films are newly restored 35mm prints!

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  Olivia: Tiny Atlas QuarterlyWhile newly hatched, Tiny Atlas Quarterly is a gorgeous photo-essay style online magazine that inspires wanderlust and photo-envy. 

    OliviaTiny Atlas Quarterly

    While newly hatched, Tiny Atlas Quarterly is a gorgeous photo-essay style online magazine that inspires wanderlust and photo-envy. 

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  Anna: Temporary Tattoos for LifeDo you ever pillage your kids' birthday party favor bags for temporary tattoos? Well, now you don't have to wear butterfies, fairies, and pirates. There's ADULT tattoos available. Inklings Tattoos out of Los Angeles has some of the most creative and witty designs for temporary skin ink, all for 1/100th of the price of the real thing and 1/1000th of the price of the removal of the real thing.

    AnnaTemporary Tattoos for Life

    Do you ever pillage your kids' birthday party favor bags for temporary tattoos? Well, now you don't have to wear butterfies, fairies, and pirates. There's ADULT tattoos available. Inklings Tattoos out of Los Angeles has some of the most creative and witty designs for temporary skin ink, all for 1/100th of the price of the real thing and 1/1000th of the price of the removal of the real thing.

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  Jaime: Patagonia's Underwear: Designer for ExposureThis Fast Company video, discovered on the Future blog, is an interview with Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard about the company's decision to stop selling their underwear in plastic packaging. Despite the warnings he received from the "person in charge of the underwear program" (such as: "Europeans aren't going to buy your underwear if someone's touched it"), Patagonia's underwear sales went up 30% by selling the goods wrapped in a simple rubber band. Love his advice at the end: "As a consumer, the best thing to do is consume less, but consume better."

    Jaime: Patagonia's Underwear: Designer for Exposure

    This Fast Company video, discovered on the Future blog, is an interview with Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard about the company's decision to stop selling their underwear in plastic packaging. Despite the warnings he received from the "person in charge of the underwear program" (such as: "Europeans aren't going to buy your underwear if someone's touched it"), Patagonia's underwear sales went up 30% by selling the goods wrapped in a simple rubber band. Love his advice at the end: "As a consumer, the best thing to do is consume less, but consume better."

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