Friday Finds 4.9.2010

We present our favorite discoveries garnered from the past week of Internet trawling, spotlighting interesting digital tidbits. Today's offering includes new Universal Design creations for the health care industry, animated gif galleries, adventures in the world of urban gardening, and musings on the history of computer graphics.

A sturdy, lightweight porter’s chair made up of fewer moving parts than traditional models, making it easy to clean and more hygienic to use. Designed by Minima, and manufactured by Vernacare.
A sturdy, lightweight porter’s chair made up of fewer moving parts than traditional models, making it easy to clean and more hygienic to use. Designed by Minima, and manufactured by Vernacare.

Aaron: Design Council's Design for Patient Dignity

This week I've been dazzled, inspired, and generally thrilled with Design Council's Design for Patient Dignity program. Meant as fairly basic redesigns of the usual British hospital experience, six design teams as well as health care design specialists from the Royal College of Art Helen Hamlyn Center have taken up prototyping and refining everything from stronger, more useful hospital gowns to mobile washrooms to smarter room dividers. Be sure to watch the short videos on each project and take heart that not all designers have the next iconic sidechair as their career ambition.

Miyoko: The Back Garden Project

friday good backgarden3

GOOD has a new blog series about growing a backyard vegetable garden being written by self-proclaimed "neighborhood enthusiast" and urban gardener Gordon Douglas. Douglas recently moved from Chicago to Brooklyn and has quite a yard to wrangle to beauty (and bounty). Here, he'll chronicle his attempts.

Jordan: I Am Not An Artist - Animated Gif Paranoia About Nonstop Design Workers

friday finds jordan

Absolutely mesmerizing, somewhat maddening but strangely meditative to sit and watch (and watch and watch and watch), I Am Not An Artist is a collection of animated gifs submitted from around the globe. Culled and curated by Johnny Kelly and Matthew Cooper, the project is a collaboration with Barcelona's Elisava School of Design and communications company Soon in Tokyo. Click on individual gifs (you can choose how they will fill your screen), zone out, and marvel at the weird and wonderful places your mind goes when you watch the same moving images on repeat. Cool stuff. via notcot

Amanda: A compendium featuring the first iteration of computer graphics

friday william fetter

In the early 1960s, artists first began exploring digital computers as tools to create new works. In those days, computers were super expensive, were so huge that their girth took up entire rooms, and generated so much heat that they needed to have special air-conditioning units blowing on them constantly. The first programs were created by manually feeding punch cards into the machine, and even then only still images could be produced. If you nose around here, you'll find an incredibly in-depth collection of computer graphics, including the first-ever computer-generated image of a human figure, created by William Fetter in 1960 (above).

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