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Imaginary Artist Houses (And Their Dwell Counterparts)

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Federico Babina's Archist City imagines what artist's own houses might look like—and while the resulting architecture is only imaginary, we've rounded up a few Dwell homes that fit the bill.
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  Federico Babina's Archist series has been making the internet rounds for its imaginative renditions of what houses designed by famous artists might look like.  Courtesy of: Federico Babina
    Federico Babina's Archist series has been making the internet rounds for its imaginative renditions of what houses designed by famous artists might look like.

    Courtesy of: Federico Babina

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  Monumental sculptor Richard Serra's imagined house, from Federico Babina's Archist series.  Courtesy of: Federico Babina
    Monumental sculptor Richard Serra's imagined house, from Federico Babina's Archist series.

    Courtesy of: Federico Babina

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  An extremely climate-resistant steel house in Phoenix, Arizona, employs three types of steel including metal mesh and Cor-Ten sheets, whose rusty hues reference Serra's monumental work. Photo by Gregg Segal.  Photo by: Gregg SegalCourtesy of: Gregg Segal

    An extremely climate-resistant steel house in Phoenix, Arizona, employs three types of steel including metal mesh and Cor-Ten sheets, whose rusty hues reference Serra's monumental work. Photo by Gregg Segal.

    Photo by: Gregg Segal

    Courtesy of: Gregg Segal

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  Contemporary painter Gerhardt Richter's imagined house, from Federico Babina's Archist series.  Courtesy of: Federico Babina
    Contemporary painter Gerhardt Richter's imagined house, from Federico Babina's Archist series.

    Courtesy of: Federico Babina

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  This eco-friendly penthouse apartment in Edmonton, Alberta, is clad with triple-glazed windows and colorful back-painted glass panels that help achieve the architect achieve her central goal: a house that’s “striking from a distance, and also delightful to live in.” Photo by Garth Crump.  Photo by: Garth Crump

    This eco-friendly penthouse apartment in Edmonton, Alberta, is clad with triple-glazed windows and colorful back-painted glass panels that help achieve the architect achieve her central goal: a house that’s “striking from a distance, and also delightful to live in.” Photo by Garth Crump.

    Photo by: Garth Crump

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  Catalan painter Antoni Tàpies's imagined house, from Federico Babina's Archist series.  Courtesy of: Federico Babina
    Catalan painter Antoni Tàpies's imagined house, from Federico Babina's Archist series.

    Courtesy of: Federico Babina

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  This renovated flat in Moshe Safdie's iconic Habitat '67 prefab apartment building in Montreal employs similar massing that looks like stacked concrete boxes.  Courtesy of: Alexi Hobbs

    This renovated flat in Moshe Safdie's iconic Habitat '67 prefab apartment building in Montreal employs similar massing that looks like stacked concrete boxes.

    Courtesy of: Alexi Hobbs

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  Minimalist Dutch artist Piet Mondrian's imagined house, from Federico Babina's Archist series.  Courtesy of: Federico Babina
    Minimalist Dutch artist Piet Mondrian's imagined house, from Federico Babina's Archist series.

    Courtesy of: Federico Babina

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  Taking cues from Piet Mondrian's iconic Broadway Boogie Woogie painting, architect and critic Joseph Giovannini recasts an entire New York City studio apartment with primary colors. Photo by Eduard Hueber.  Photo by: Eduard Hueber

    Taking cues from Piet Mondrian's iconic Broadway Boogie Woogie painting, architect and critic Joseph Giovannini recasts an entire New York City studio apartment with primary colors. Photo by Eduard Hueber.

    Photo by: Eduard Hueber

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  Spatialist artist and sculptor Lucio Fontana's imagined house, from Federico Babina's Archist series.  Courtesy of: Federico Babina
    Spatialist artist and sculptor Lucio Fontana's imagined house, from Federico Babina's Archist series.

    Courtesy of: Federico Babina

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  Sculpture meets architecture in the surrealist facade of the Synagogue de Delme visitors center in northeastern France. Photo by Olivier-Henri Dancy.  Photo by: Olivier-Henri Dancy

    Sculpture meets architecture in the surrealist facade of the Synagogue de Delme visitors center in northeastern France. Photo by Olivier-Henri Dancy.

    Photo by: Olivier-Henri Dancy

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