The Design Community that Defines New York City

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July 24, 2014
A biennial at New York's MAD Museum, open through October 12, 2014, explores the rich design community of New York City—a group whose creations set the tone of the ever-shifting city. "It’s expensive to have space to produce and make one’s work in New York City," says curator Jake Yuzna. "Those who choose to come to NYC, and/or stay in NYC, fight against that tide—they strive to change the cultural landscape of the city, and through their adaptive practices, are doing it." Click through the slideshow for a look at some of the pieces on view.
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  Stepin One 2 by Rafael de Cárdenas/Architecture at LargeThe exhibition includes an immersive space designed by architect Rafael de Cárdenas. "The project paid homage to the unique design of nightclubs in NYC from the 1970s to the early 90s, as well as to the important role these spaces have in fostering creative collaborations and communities," exhibition curator Jake Yuzna says."Equally as interesting is that each person who worked on the project, from designer to fabricator, was credited in a large wall graphic. I think many people understand that it takes a huge team to make an ambitious project like a feature film, but often similar teams behind other ambitious projects, like architecture or large scale artworks, remain relatively unknown."  Courtesy of: Benoit Pailley

    Stepin One 2 by Rafael de Cárdenas/Architecture at Large

    The exhibition includes an immersive space designed by architect Rafael de Cárdenas. "The project paid homage to the unique design of nightclubs in NYC from the 1970s to the early 90s, as well as to the important role these spaces have in fostering creative collaborations and communities," exhibition curator Jake Yuzna says.

    "Equally as interesting is that each person who worked on the project, from designer to fabricator, was credited in a large wall graphic. I think many people understand that it takes a huge team to make an ambitious project like a feature film, but often similar teams behind other ambitious projects, like architecture or large scale artworks, remain relatively unknown."

    Courtesy of: Benoit Pailley

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  Disclaim Bolt N.14.6 by BFAMFAPhDBFAMFAPhD is a collaborative that works to address the constrains of rent, debt, and precarity on creative people. In one project (pictured), disclaimed paintings were sewn together and used to make motorcycle jackets."The culture of making is immense," says Yuzna. "In the work of BFAMFAPhD, we get a sense of the incredible numbers of these 'creative workers': there are over 1.3 million people in the United States who have degrees in the arts—that’s more than doctors, lawyers, and firefighters combined."   Courtesy of: Eric Scott

    Disclaim Bolt N.14.6 by BFAMFAPhD

    BFAMFAPhD is a collaborative that works to address the constrains of rent, debt, and precarity on creative people. In one project (pictured), disclaimed paintings were sewn together and used to make motorcycle jackets.

    "The culture of making is immense," says Yuzna. "In the work of BFAMFAPhD, we get a sense of the incredible numbers of these 'creative workers': there are over 1.3 million people in the United States who have degrees in the arts—that’s more than doctors, lawyers, and firefighters combined."

     

    Courtesy of: Eric Scott

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  Vigilant Floral wallpaper by Flavor Paper, Jesse Hlebo, and Carlos Benaim"Carlos created a new scent that was [meant to embody] the 'scent of 100 makers’ creativity,'" Yuzna says. "It builds up layers as you walk up the stairwells of the museum. [Artist] Jesse then used these layers as inspiration to recognize the creative communities that make NYC so special."  Courtesy of: Eric Scott

    Vigilant Floral wallpaper by Flavor Paper, Jesse Hlebo, and Carlos Benaim

    "Carlos created a new scent that was [meant to embody] the 'scent of 100 makers’ creativity,'" Yuzna says. "It builds up layers as you walk up the stairwells of the museum. [Artist] Jesse then used these layers as inspiration to recognize the creative communities that make NYC so special."

    Courtesy of: Eric Scott

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  Geometrics, Figures and Solids Table by Misha KahnOther works on view include this cement table by Brooklyn-based designer Misha Kahn.  Courtesy of: Clemens Kois

    Geometrics, Figures and Solids Table by Misha Kahn

    Other works on view include this cement table by Brooklyn-based designer Misha Kahn.

    Courtesy of: Clemens Kois

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  Volcano by Steven and William LaddBrothers Steven and William Ladd create what they call Towers, stacks of approximately 24 hand sewn boxes constructed of fabric and found materials. Volcano (pictured) tells the story of the brothers' efforts to achieve extreme fitness.  Courtesy of: Andrew Zuckerman

    Volcano by Steven and William Ladd

    Brothers Steven and William Ladd create what they call Towers, stacks of approximately 24 hand sewn boxes constructed of fabric and found materials. Volcano (pictured) tells the story of the brothers' efforts to achieve extreme fitness.

    Courtesy of: Andrew Zuckerman

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  Brooms by Fredericks and MaeDesign duo Fredericks and Mae contributed their quirky horsehair brooms.  Courtesy of: Darroch Putnam

    Brooms by Fredericks and Mae

    Design duo Fredericks and Mae contributed their quirky horsehair brooms.

    Courtesy of: Darroch Putnam

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  Pink Perch by UM ProjectThis sculptural object by designer François Chambard doubles as a playable musical instrument.  Courtesy of: Francis Dzikwoski/Esto

    Pink Perch by UM Project

    This sculptural object by designer François Chambard doubles as a playable musical instrument.

    Courtesy of: Francis Dzikwoski/Esto

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  An installation view of the biennial. The elevator bank is covered in a metallic fringe by Confetti System.  Courtesy of: Eric Scott

    An installation view of the biennial. The elevator bank is covered in a metallic fringe by Confetti System.

    Courtesy of: Eric Scott

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