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Andy Warhol at The Brant Foundation Study Center

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The first comprehensive survey of Andy Warhol's oeuvre, this extensive homage to Warhol spans his early days as an illustrator to some of his best-known works like Marilyn and Mao. The exhibition also reflects Peter Brant's lasting passion for Warhol's art, and his impressive career as a collector—beginning with the start of their friendship more than four decades ago.
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  Opened May 2009, The Brant Foundation Art Study Center in Greenwich, Connecticut was built on the site of a converted 110-year-old stone barn, as engineered by architect Richard Gluckman. The redesigned 9,800-square-foot space is kept as a gallery and learning center, showcasing long-term exhibitions meant to promote the appreciation of contemporary art and design.Credit: Joe Schildhorn /BFAnyc.com, Courtesy: The Brant Foundation

    Opened May 2009, The Brant Foundation Art Study Center in Greenwich, Connecticut was built on the site of a converted 110-year-old stone barn, as engineered by architect Richard Gluckman. The redesigned 9,800-square-foot space is kept as a gallery and learning center, showcasing long-term exhibitions meant to promote the appreciation of contemporary art and design.

    Credit: Joe Schildhorn /BFAnyc.com, Courtesy: The Brant Foundation

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  Sure to appeal to Warhol purists and art history enthusiasts, the exhibit was carefully organized chronologically: from the early fifties to the artist’s death in 1987.Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

    Sure to appeal to Warhol purists and art history enthusiasts, the exhibit was carefully organized chronologically: from the early fifties to the artist’s death in 1987.

    Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

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  According to Brant, during his early years Andy often contributed illustrations to Tiffany’s seasonal ads—including these nativity drawings from a Christmas campaign. Commercial drawings of Andy's like these were one of the first times he would use transfers from stamps, a process which would later be used on drawings of Jackie Kennedy and other works.Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

    According to Brant, during his early years Andy often contributed illustrations to Tiffany’s seasonal ads—including these nativity drawings from a Christmas campaign. Commercial drawings of Andy's like these were one of the first times he would use transfers from stamps, a process which would later be used on drawings of Jackie Kennedy and other works.

    Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

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  Pin the tail on the Donkey (1954-55) rests above a Hughes daybed. The exhibition also contains a selection of Warhol’s drawings and gold-foil works, from cats and shoes, to flowers, hung in a replication of a cozy salon. Other objects included are a pair of painted wooden shoes, porcelain sculptures, and a folding hand-painted screen.Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

    Pin the tail on the Donkey (1954-55) rests above a Hughes daybed. The exhibition also contains a selection of Warhol’s drawings and gold-foil works, from cats and shoes, to flowers, hung in a replication of a cozy salon. Other objects included are a pair of painted wooden shoes, porcelain sculptures, and a folding hand-painted screen.

    Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

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  On display are the classic “Marilyns,” flowers, Brillo boxes, and Polaroids, as well as the Maos and Basquiat prints.Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

    On display are the classic “Marilyns,” flowers, Brillo boxes, and Polaroids, as well as the Maos and Basquiat prints.

    Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

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  From Warhol’s famous hyper-color prints of hibiscus flowers (background), to his little known (unreleased) perfume collaboration (contained within the silver Coke bottles in front).Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

    From Warhol’s famous hyper-color prints of hibiscus flowers (background), to his little known (unreleased) perfume collaboration (contained within the silver Coke bottles in front).

    Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

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  From Warhol’s tabloid "Death and Disaster" series from the early 1960s. Drawn to the ugliness as well as glamour and beauty, Warhol's work often shined a light on hidden corners of the world the media had forgotten.Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

    From Warhol’s tabloid "Death and Disaster" series from the early 1960s. Drawn to the ugliness as well as glamour and beauty, Warhol's work often shined a light on hidden corners of the world the media had forgotten.

    Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

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  Square “celebrity” portraits of Elizabeth Taylor, Mao, and Jean-Michel Basquiat were some of the highlights of the show.Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

    Square “celebrity” portraits of Elizabeth Taylor, Mao, and Jean-Michel Basquiat were some of the highlights of the show.

    Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

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  1964 “Bullet Hole Marilyns,” or “Shot Light Blue Marilyn” (1964).The result of an incident at Warhol’s Factory art studio when performance artist Dorothy Parker came in and fired a revolver at four finished images of Marilyn Monroe, the blue dot is the only remnant of the damage. As Brant explained to us on our recent tour: "She came in and asked if she could shoot the Marilyn. Then she came in, took out a gun, and shot the Marilyn."Credit Andy Warhol, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

    1964 “Bullet Hole Marilyns,” or “Shot Light Blue Marilyn” (1964).

    The result of an incident at Warhol’s Factory art studio when performance artist Dorothy Parker came in and fired a revolver at four finished images of Marilyn Monroe, the blue dot is the only remnant of the damage. As Brant explained to us on our recent tour: "She came in and asked if she could shoot the Marilyn. Then she came in, took out a gun, and shot the Marilyn."

    Credit Andy Warhol, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

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  Other interesting additions included Polaroids from the '70s and '80’s featuring familiar faces.Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation 

    Other interesting additions included Polaroids from the '70s and '80’s featuring familiar faces.

    Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

     

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  One of two films on show at The Brant Center.Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

    One of two films on show at The Brant Center.

    Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

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  It’s often been said that after Warhol created this print of Nixon, the notoriously petty leader requested Warhol be audited for several years to come.Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

    It’s often been said that after Warhol created this print of Nixon, the notoriously petty leader requested Warhol be audited for several years to come.

    Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

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  A 1986 self-portrait of the artist in his "fright wig."Credit Andy Warhol, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

    A 1986 self-portrait of the artist in his "fright wig."

    Credit Andy Warhol, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

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  One of his final works before his death 1987; Warhol’s The Last Supper is on view in the final large room, surrounded by complementary detail prints. The piece, which Warhol traced onto canvas in black ink from a photocopied image of Leonardo da Vinci’s masterpiece, ads fittingly somber tone to the end of the exhibit.Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

    One of his final works before his death 1987; Warhol’s The Last Supper is on view in the final large room, surrounded by complementary detail prints. The piece, which Warhol traced onto canvas in black ink from a photocopied image of Leonardo da Vinci’s masterpiece, ads fittingly somber tone to the end of the exhibit.

    Credit Stefan Altenburger, Courtesy The Brant Foundation

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  Urs Fischer, the grounds of the Brant Foundation Study Center.Credit: Joe Schildhorn /BFAnyc.com, Courtesy: The Brant Foundation

    Urs Fischer, the grounds of the Brant Foundation Study Center.

    Credit: Joe Schildhorn /BFAnyc.com, Courtesy: The Brant Foundation

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