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October 28, 2013
When overhead lighting is too harsh and floor and tabletop space is limited, opt for the ambiance of beautiful wall sconces. Check out these seven homeowners who have used wall sconces in creative and practical ways to add light and intrigue to their spaces.
Sconces hang in front of the living room niche. The furnishings of the architect’s design are fully stocked with pillows made from exotic patterned fabrics.

PALACE INTRIGUE

In the Lithuanian capital of Vilnius, architect Rytis Mikulionis spent several years property hunting for his first nesting ground and finally ended up inside a former Soviet army barrack, which was, before that, a building on the grounds of a Baroque palace. He chose sconces to hang in front of the living room niche.

Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.

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Originally appeared in Palace Intrigue
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Ceramic floors with radiant heating and cozy wall sconces top off the distinctive appearance, smell, and sound.

SHIP SHAPE

Ceramic floors with radiant heating and cozy wall sconces top off the distinctive appearance, smell, and sound of this architect's family home in Amsterdam’s Steigereiland.

Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.

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Originally appeared in Ship Shape
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living room Brooklyn family home

A HOUSE GROWS IN BROOKLYN

Darcy Miro and her son, Lucien, enjoy a moment in their new double-height living room. The Charlotte Perriand wall sconces are vintage finds.

Photo by Dean Kaufman.

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Originally appeared in A House Grows in Brooklyn
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Modern blue sofa in white living room.

A FURNITURE COLLECTOR'S RENOVATED FLAT IN PARIS

Jean-Christophe Aumas outfitted a vintage steel-frame sofa by George Nelson in navy blue fabric from Kvadrat and hung one of his own photos just above it. The lamp to the left of the sofa is a 1960s design found at a Lisbon flea market, and to the right of the sofa is a Two-Arms rotating sconce by the mid-century French designer Serge Mouille.

Photo by Christian Schaulin.

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Originally appeared in A Furniture Collector's Renovated Flat in Paris
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14 sconces on wall in the master bedroom

MODERN ANGULAR RURAL FAMILY HOME IN CANADA

Designer Omer Arbel's “14” sconces spot the wall to ethereal effect in the master bedroom. “I wanted this place to be habitable. One of my greatest criticisms of modern architecture is that it often forgets to make things cozy.”

Photo by Jason Schmidt.

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Originally appeared in Modern Angular Rural Family Home in Canada
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Master bedroom with Christopher Deam furniture and Arne Jacobsen sconce

DESIGNED IN-HOUSE

Dwell founder Lara Hedberg Deam designed all of the built-in furniture in her Mill Valley, California home, including this bedside console that features an Arne Jacobsen sconce.

Photo by Dustin Aksland.

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Originally appeared in Designed In-House
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Back in the master bedroom, the designers installed Tolomeo wall sconces by <a href="http://www.artemide.us/">Artemide</a> next to the bed and placed a bench next to the door made by Hart's uncle, Peter Czuk of <a href="http://www.czukstudio.com/">Czuk St

NOE VALLEY RENOVATION

In the master bedroom, the designers installed Tolomeo wall sconces by Artemide next to the bed and placed a bench next to the door made by Hart's uncle, Peter Czuk of Czuk Studio. The bedroom door, which is rarely closed, is the starting point for the continuous flow of movement and light from the top of the house to the main level and down to the bottom floor.

Photo by Sharon Risedorph

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Noe Valley Renovation
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Sconces hang in front of the living room niche. The furnishings of the architect’s design are fully stocked with pillows made from exotic patterned fabrics.

PALACE INTRIGUE

In the Lithuanian capital of Vilnius, architect Rytis Mikulionis spent several years property hunting for his first nesting ground and finally ended up inside a former Soviet army barrack, which was, before that, a building on the grounds of a Baroque palace. He chose sconces to hang in front of the living room niche.

Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.

Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.

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