Advertising
Advertising

You are here

ICFF 2011: From the Show Floor

Read Article

I'll admit, it's a little daunting stepping onto the show floor at the International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF), held for a long May weekend every year at the Javits Convention Center in New York. There's a lot to see. But once you start wandering the aisles, uncovering design gems in the various booths is a blast. Here's round one of some of the things I saw that stuck with me.

  • 
  Freddy Hill works out of a converted bomb factory in Cleveland, hence his furniture company's eponymous name—Bomb Factory. This piece was inspired by his appreciation for Japanese design, specifically the kuruma dansu, which, in the 17th century, was commonly used to keep and easily transport valuables for families (in case of fire), or merchants. Hill built the unit entirely by hand, and the steel caster wheels came from his warehouse.
    Freddy Hill works out of a converted bomb factory in Cleveland, hence his furniture company's eponymous name—Bomb Factory. This piece was inspired by his appreciation for Japanese design, specifically the kuruma dansu, which, in the 17th century, was commonly used to keep and easily transport valuables for families (in case of fire), or merchants. Hill built the unit entirely by hand, and the steel caster wheels came from his warehouse.
  • 
  San Francisco's very own Council Design had some good looking new additions to its already ample collection. Merge is a series of tables—small side (pictured), plus dining square versions—designed by One & Co. The indoor/outdoor pieces can come with a variety of base colors, as well as a dark grey glass top.
    San Francisco's very own Council Design had some good looking new additions to its already ample collection. Merge is a series of tables—small side (pictured), plus dining square versions—designed by One & Co. The indoor/outdoor pieces can come with a variety of base colors, as well as a dark grey glass top.
  • 
  Congrats to the boys—Theo Richardson, Charles Brill, and Alexander Williams—behind New York's Rich, Brilliant, Willing. This was their first year showing at the ICFF, and the trio snagged an Editors Award for New Designer. Quart (on the left) was my favorite of their new introductions; the shade took its original form from a standard paint can. The marble base adds a nice weight and contrast to the white above. The aluminum extrusion of Channel (on the right) houses a strip of LEDs, with a hickory mast made at a factory that manufactures broomstick handles.
    Congrats to the boys—Theo Richardson, Charles Brill, and Alexander Williams—behind New York's Rich, Brilliant, Willing. This was their first year showing at the ICFF, and the trio snagged an Editors Award for New Designer. Quart (on the left) was my favorite of their new introductions; the shade took its original form from a standard paint can. The marble base adds a nice weight and contrast to the white above. The aluminum extrusion of Channel (on the right) houses a strip of LEDs, with a hickory mast made at a factory that manufactures broomstick handles.
  • 
  From the Source, a Brooklyn-based studio (with a showroom in Chelsea), collaborated with Stephen Burks to design their first collection that incorporates color in with their largely reclaimed, FSC-certified Indonesian woods. Powder-coated pop hues complimented the warm color variations on the timber.
    From the Source, a Brooklyn-based studio (with a showroom in Chelsea), collaborated with Stephen Burks to design their first collection that incorporates color in with their largely reclaimed, FSC-certified Indonesian woods. Powder-coated pop hues complimented the warm color variations on the timber.
  • 
  Here's Cube, stackable stoneware dishes by Sema Obuz for Ilio, the Istanbul-based, Demirden Design-backed furniture and accessories brand. The set comes with twelve pieces—six shallow and six deep—that look cool enough to keep out on your countertop when not in use.
    Here's Cube, stackable stoneware dishes by Sema Obuz for Ilio, the Istanbul-based, Demirden Design-backed furniture and accessories brand. The set comes with twelve pieces—six shallow and six deep—that look cool enough to keep out on your countertop when not in use.
  • 
  Scavenging Seattle streets for stray cardboard boxes is all part of the creative process for Graypants, whose Jupiter and Drum scrap lights are laser cut from pieces of the thick brown paper product. I like how the big one looks a bit like the Death Star.
    Scavenging Seattle streets for stray cardboard boxes is all part of the creative process for Graypants, whose Jupiter and Drum scrap lights are laser cut from pieces of the thick brown paper product. I like how the big one looks a bit like the Death Star.
  • 
  Look closely at the subtle pattern on Åre, this thick, cozy-as-hell wool blanket by Espen Voll and Torbjørn Andersen for Norwegian brand Roros Tweed. Though the duo has been experimenting with bold color combinations, the softer shades of these single-hued coverings get a bit of visual intrigue with the shapes that emerge during the production process. The lines are woven more tightly than the rest of the fabric, and when the textile goes through a machine that tufts it up, the tufting needles (not the technical term!) can't catch the tauter weave, so it remains imprinted.
    Look closely at the subtle pattern on Åre, this thick, cozy-as-hell wool blanket by Espen Voll and Torbjørn Andersen for Norwegian brand Roros Tweed. Though the duo has been experimenting with bold color combinations, the softer shades of these single-hued coverings get a bit of visual intrigue with the shapes that emerge during the production process. The lines are woven more tightly than the rest of the fabric, and when the textile goes through a machine that tufts it up, the tufting needles (not the technical term!) can't catch the tauter weave, so it remains imprinted.
  • 
  San Francisco-based designer Peter Stathis was all over the convention center, with some fantastic new lighting with Humanscale and, pictured here, Joby. Obus is an incredibly clever indoor/outdoor light. It charges when its placed on its (presumably indoor) base, but then, say, it's nighttime and you're walking out to have a beer in the backyard. When you pick Obus up, it turns into a flashlight (!). Setting it down on any flat surface will transform it back to its (dimmable) ambient glow.
    San Francisco-based designer Peter Stathis was all over the convention center, with some fantastic new lighting with Humanscale and, pictured here, Joby. Obus is an incredibly clever indoor/outdoor light. It charges when its placed on its (presumably indoor) base, but then, say, it's nighttime and you're walking out to have a beer in the backyard. When you pick Obus up, it turns into a flashlight (!). Setting it down on any flat surface will transform it back to its (dimmable) ambient glow.
  • 
  Foil is indoor/outdoor curtain from Elasticco that uses magnets to maintain its shape. So instead of futzing around with strings to adjust its position, simply scrunch up the fabric and it will stay in place. Super cool.
    Foil is indoor/outdoor curtain from Elasticco that uses magnets to maintain its shape. So instead of futzing around with strings to adjust its position, simply scrunch up the fabric and it will stay in place. Super cool.
  • 
  Hallway storage made very awesome at the Design Deutschland exhibit. Mark Braun is a German up-and-comer who designed Floor 95, this single piece that would keep all your must-haves handy by the front door.
    Hallway storage made very awesome at the Design Deutschland exhibit. Mark Braun is a German up-and-comer who designed Floor 95, this single piece that would keep all your must-haves handy by the front door.
  • 
  Play musical chairs. Literally. A cute little Xylophone seat from Dpot.Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our  FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!
    Play musical chairs. Literally. A cute little Xylophone seat from Dpot.

    Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!

@current / @total

More

Add comment

Log in or register to post comments
Advertising