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Highlights of Dwell Design Lab

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This past weekend I attended Dwell's first annual Design Lab, which took over a raw penthouse space in the new Millenium Tower in San Francisco's SOMA district and spotlighted 13 local designers. (My colleague Diana Budds offers a good overview of the event here.) After a festive, Kim Crawford Wine-fueled Friday night reception, I spent Saturday afternoon wandering through the show, chatting with the designers about their work and their display spaces. Here are a few of the highlights I spotted... 

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  Here's E.B. Min (right) of  Min Day, talking with a Design Lab attendee. Min's firm has recently been experimenting with CNC milling, as evidenced by both their portfolio of residential projects and their design lab booth—two boards digitally sliced and diced into a striking modern screen.  Photo by: Tammy Vinson
    Here's E.B. Min (right) of Min Day, talking with a Design Lab attendee. Min's firm has recently been experimenting with CNC milling, as evidenced by both their portfolio of residential projects and their design lab booth—two boards digitally sliced and diced into a striking modern screen.

    Photo by: Tammy Vinson

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  Here's an example of their CNC work in situ: a loft wall in a residential project in Omaha, Nebraska, where the firm's co-founder, Jeffrey L. Day, is based.  Photo by: Tammy Vinson
    Here's an example of their CNC work in situ: a loft wall in a residential project in Omaha, Nebraska, where the firm's co-founder, Jeffrey L. Day, is based.

    Photo by: Tammy Vinson

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  Anchoring a corner of the Design Lab floor was the trifecta of  David Mast, Kendall Wilkinson, and Black Mountain Construction, who team up on design projects to create a seamless design-build experience for their clients. Here's Mast (center) discussing his "zen, less-is-more" design philosophy with two attendees.  Photo by: Tammy Vinson
    Anchoring a corner of the Design Lab floor was the trifecta of David Mast, Kendall Wilkinson, and Black Mountain Construction, who team up on design projects to create a seamless design-build experience for their clients. Here's Mast (center) discussing his "zen, less-is-more" design philosophy with two attendees.

    Photo by: Tammy Vinson

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  Colorful wool rugs by Florence Broadhurst formed a bright backdrop for the large, cozy, lounge-like booth.  Photo by: Tammy Vinson
    Colorful wool rugs by Florence Broadhurst formed a bright backdrop for the large, cozy, lounge-like booth.

    Photo by: Tammy Vinson

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  I enjoyed speaking with  Martine Paquin, a LEED-accredited architect and designer who focuses on modern, sustainable, environmentally friendly residential design.  Photo by: Tammy Vinson
    I enjoyed speaking with Martine Paquin, a LEED-accredited architect and designer who focuses on modern, sustainable, environmentally friendly residential design.

    Photo by: Tammy Vinson

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  She had an epic spot on the show floor, overlooking the city skyline and Bay. We were on the 58th floor, after all! Overhead, a trio of Molo Cloud Softlights glow softly.  Photo by: Tammy Vinson
    She had an epic spot on the show floor, overlooking the city skyline and Bay. We were on the 58th floor, after all! Overhead, a trio of Molo Cloud Softlights glow softly.

    Photo by: Tammy Vinson

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  Paquin also took a CNC router to her boards, creating a textured backdrop for photographs of her recent residential work. She's especially experienced with kitchens and bathrooms, and works closely on every detail, from layout to tile placement and detailing.  Photo by: Tammy Vinson
    Paquin also took a CNC router to her boards, creating a textured backdrop for photographs of her recent residential work. She's especially experienced with kitchens and bathrooms, and works closely on every detail, from layout to tile placement and detailing.

    Photo by: Tammy Vinson

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  A bench along the window displayed some of Paquin's favorite materials, many of them made of recycled materials.  Photo by: Tammy Vinson
    A bench along the window displayed some of Paquin's favorite materials, many of them made of recycled materials.

    Photo by: Tammy Vinson

  • 
  Another highlight of the show for me was talking with the effervescent metalworker  Jefferson Mack (seated), who creates sculptural steel coffee table bases, andirons, chairs, and light fixtures—including a few designs sold at Restoration Hardware.  Photo by: Tammy Vinson
    Another highlight of the show for me was talking with the effervescent metalworker Jefferson Mack (seated), who creates sculptural steel coffee table bases, andirons, chairs, and light fixtures—including a few designs sold at Restoration Hardware.

    Photo by: Tammy Vinson

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  Here's Mack's mild steel X-Ray chandelier, a steampunk-ish light fixture that has something of a mad scientist vibe. It looked great at night, all lit up.  Photo by: Tammy Vinson
    Here's Mack's mild steel X-Ray chandelier, a steampunk-ish light fixture that has something of a mad scientist vibe. It looked great at night, all lit up.

    Photo by: Tammy Vinson

  • 
  Mack manned his booth with his son, 15-year-old Peter Mack, a budding blacksmith himself.  Photo by: Tammy Vinson
    Mack manned his booth with his son, 15-year-old Peter Mack, a budding blacksmith himself.

    Photo by: Tammy Vinson

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  Here's Peter with a set of the jagged-edged hollow steel cubes that he designs and makes himself. They range in size from three to six inches square, and Jefferson sells them on his website for $50 to $90 each. They're also sold at the San Francisco design showroom Coup d'Etat at a hefty markup... the young Mack's first design retail success! They make a nice sculptural centerpiece on a coffee table—which is how the Macks displayed them over the weekend.Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our  FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!   Photo by: Tammy Vinson
    Here's Peter with a set of the jagged-edged hollow steel cubes that he designs and makes himself. They range in size from three to six inches square, and Jefferson sells them on his website for $50 to $90 each. They're also sold at the San Francisco design showroom Coup d'Etat at a hefty markup... the young Mack's first design retail success! They make a nice sculptural centerpiece on a coffee table—which is how the Macks displayed them over the weekend.

    Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!

    Photo by: Tammy Vinson

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