Design Guide: San Diego

written by:
March 12, 2014
Read Full Article
  • 
  This San Diego home, designed by Soheil and Nima Nakhshab, brings together mid-century opulence with a contemporary quest for sustainability, as the first single-family LEED Gold–certified residence in San Diego. Here, a Nelson sofa sits on a handmade Persian Mahi rug in the living room. Photo by Ye Rin Mok.  Photo by Ye Rin Mok.   This originally appeared in The First LEED Gold-Certified Family Home in San Diego.
    This San Diego home, designed by Soheil and Nima Nakhshab, brings together mid-century opulence with a contemporary quest for sustainability, as the first single-family LEED Gold–certified residence in San Diego. Here, a Nelson sofa sits on a handmade Persian Mahi rug in the living room. Photo by Ye Rin Mok.
    Photo by Ye Rin Mok.
    This originally appeared in The First LEED Gold-Certified Family Home in San Diego.
  • 
  Soheil and Nima Nakhshaband's objective with Shayan House was to create a home that was not only green but that would also comfortably accommodate three generations of the family. The multigenerational home places great emphasis on outdoor space, where a set of Bertoia chairs offer an appealing perch around a vintage glass-and-metal table. Photo by Ye Rin Mok.  Photo by Ye Rin Mok.   This originally appeared in The First LEED Gold-Certified Family Home in San Diego.

    Soheil and Nima Nakhshaband's objective with Shayan House was to create a home that was not only green but that would also comfortably accommodate three generations of the family. The multigenerational home places great emphasis on outdoor space, where a set of Bertoia chairs offer an appealing perch around a vintage glass-and-metal table. Photo by Ye Rin Mok.

    Photo by Ye Rin Mok.
    This originally appeared in The First LEED Gold-Certified Family Home in San Diego.
  • 
  Even though he was born in Mexico City, San Diego–based designer and developer Sebastian Mariscal has readily absorbed the Californian obsession with deck life. This idea is clearly visible in his designs for a pair of identical houses called 2inns (pronounced “twins”). Here Sebastian and his wife Maricarmen take in the scenery from the comfort of their exposed living room. The couple sits on a Polder sofa by Hella Jongerius for Vitra. Photo by Bryce Duffy.  Photo by Bryce Duffy.   This originally appeared in Double the Pleasure.

    Even though he was born in Mexico City, San Diego–based designer and developer Sebastian Mariscal has readily absorbed the Californian obsession with deck life. This idea is clearly visible in his designs for a pair of identical houses called 2inns (pronounced “twins”). Here Sebastian and his wife Maricarmen take in the scenery from the comfort of their exposed living room. The couple sits on a Polder sofa by Hella Jongerius for Vitra. Photo by Bryce Duffy.

    Photo by Bryce Duffy.
    This originally appeared in Double the Pleasure.
  • 
  Architect Jonathan Segal sticks to his motto of keeping it simple in designing his own home in the section of downtown San Diego known as Little Italy. His son Matthew sets about finishing his latest knitting project while lounging on furniture of his dad’s design. A sound system and lighting by Halo are recessed into the ceiling. Photo by Randi Berez.  Photo by Randi Berez.   This originally appeared in The Jonathan.

    Architect Jonathan Segal sticks to his motto of keeping it simple in designing his own home in the section of downtown San Diego known as Little Italy. His son Matthew sets about finishing his latest knitting project while lounging on furniture of his dad’s design. A sound system and lighting by Halo are recessed into the ceiling. Photo by Randi Berez.

    Photo by Randi Berez.
    This originally appeared in The Jonathan.
  • 
  Public Architecture and Planning built this San Diego home for a family who loves the outdoors. Case in point: Gabriella swings on the rope swing hung from the podocarpus tree in the courtyard. The twenty-foot-tall, steel-framed, custom-built wood screen provides enough privacy to give the outdoor space the feeling of a room. Photo by Noah Webb.  Photo by Noah Webb.   This originally appeared in The Family Tree.

    Public Architecture and Planning built this San Diego home for a family who loves the outdoors. Case in point: Gabriella swings on the rope swing hung from the podocarpus tree in the courtyard. The twenty-foot-tall, steel-framed, custom-built wood screen provides enough privacy to give the outdoor space the feeling of a room. Photo by Noah Webb.

    Photo by Noah Webb.
    This originally appeared in The Family Tree.
  • 
  When San Diego residents Im and David Schafer moved in together they faced the challenge of combining the contents of David’s 880-square-foot loft and Im’s 550-square-foot apartment into a one-room, 426-square-foot downtown loft. The Schaffer's furniture includes an Eames Aluminum Group lounge chair ("and ottoman!" adds Im.) A coffee table made of glued, corrugated cardboard was the couple's first project together, when they met in college. Photo by Misha Gravenor.  Photo by Misha Gravenor.   This originally appeared in Living Room.

    When San Diego residents Im and David Schafer moved in together they faced the challenge of combining the contents of David’s 880-square-foot loft and Im’s 550-square-foot apartment into a one-room, 426-square-foot downtown loft. The Schaffer's furniture includes an Eames Aluminum Group lounge chair ("and ottoman!" adds Im.) A coffee table made of glued, corrugated cardboard was the couple's first project together, when they met in college. Photo by Misha Gravenor.

    Photo by Misha Gravenor.
    This originally appeared in Living Room.
  • 
  In the absence of natural light, architect Nathan Lee Colkitt opened up his loft in order to maximize a sense of spaciousness in a multi-unit building in San Diego’s Little Italy neighborhood. Photo by Cheryl Ramsay.    This originally appeared in San Diego Cadres.

    In the absence of natural light, architect Nathan Lee Colkitt opened up his loft in order to maximize a sense of spaciousness in a multi-unit building in San Diego’s Little Italy neighborhood. Photo by Cheryl Ramsay.

    This originally appeared in San Diego Cadres.
  • 
  Louis Kahn’s Salk Institute is a stunning building that looks directly out to the sea. Architectural tourists flock to the site, which still functions as a working laboratory. Photo by Bryce Duffy.  Photo by Bryce Duffy.   This originally appeared in San Diego, CA.

    Louis Kahn’s Salk Institute is a stunning building that looks directly out to the sea. Architectural tourists flock to the site, which still functions as a working laboratory. Photo by Bryce Duffy.

    Photo by Bryce Duffy.
    This originally appeared in San Diego, CA.
Previous Next
Slideshow loading...
@current / @total
Read Full Article

You May Also Like

Join the Discussion

Loading comments...