6 Dwell Travel Itineraries

written by:
August 9, 2013
Did you know Dwell has covered design in far-flung locations since our very beginning? What was once called Elsewhere has since evolved to departments we call "Detour" and "Postcard". Here are a few of our favorite travel stories from issues past.
  • 
  Brussels, BelgiumBelgium assumed independence in 1830 after being taken over, and over and over, by its neighbors to the north and south—the Netherlands and France. Over-looked (Jacques Brel, french fries, and Johnny Hallyday are theirs, Belgians will tell you tersely) and underappreciated (it’s the flyover between Paris and Amsterdam), Brussels has a kind of runt-of-the-litter charm.  Photo by: Roy Zipstein

    Brussels, Belgium

    Belgium assumed independence in 1830 after being taken over, and over and over, by its neighbors to the north and south—the Netherlands and France. Over-looked (Jacques Brel, french fries, and Johnny Hallyday are theirs, Belgians will tell you tersely) and underappreciated (it’s the flyover between Paris and Amsterdam), Brussels has a kind of runt-of-the-litter charm.

    Photo by: Roy Zipstein

  • 
  Cologne, GermanyThree pointed spires dominate the skyline of Cologne, Germany, from nearly every vantage in the city. The ornate gothic cathedral, built at the heart of the Roman plan’s concentric rings, looms over low-rise buildings and fanning arteries. More than 90 percent of the city was destroyed by Allied bombing raids during World War II, and as a result, the architectural tourist feels an inescapable sobering sensation. Rebuilding an ancient city in the course of a few decades created a varnish of brutal modernity, but scratching Cologne’s surface reveals a vibrant center of art and design.

    Cologne, Germany

    Three pointed spires dominate the skyline of Cologne, Germany, from nearly every vantage in the city. The ornate gothic cathedral, built at the heart of the Roman plan’s concentric rings, looms over low-rise buildings and fanning arteries. More than 90 percent of the city was destroyed by Allied bombing raids during World War II, and as a result, the architectural tourist feels an inescapable sobering sensation. Rebuilding an ancient city in the course of a few decades created a varnish of brutal modernity, but scratching Cologne’s surface reveals a vibrant center of art and design.

  • 
  Malmö, SwedenMalmö, one of the two cities linked by the bridge, is experiencing a transformation similar to that of Peberholm—a renaissance that is as much manufactured as it is organic, and whose output can be gleaned from as far off as Copenhagen. From across the Øresund, Santiago Calatrava’s Turning Torso looks like the sole survivor of a city devastatingly razed. Of course, this is entirely due to the structure’s towering scale, as much a testament to one man’s vision as to a city’s will to power. Over the course of ten years, Malmö has transformed itself from a working-class, industrial city to a veritable uberstadt of the IT, design, and biotech industries.  Photo by: Magnus Marding

    Malmö, Sweden

    Malmö, one of the two cities linked by the bridge, is experiencing a transformation similar to that of Peberholm—a renaissance that is as much manufactured as it is organic, and whose output can be gleaned from as far off as Copenhagen. From across the Øresund, Santiago Calatrava’s Turning Torso looks like the sole survivor of a city devastatingly razed. Of course, this is entirely due to the structure’s towering scale, as much a testament to one man’s vision as to a city’s will to power. Over the course of ten years, Malmö has transformed itself from a working-class, industrial city to a veritable uberstadt of the IT, design, and biotech industries.

    Photo by: Magnus Marding

  • 
  Lima, PeruThough often shrouded in fog, Lima is one of the world’s driest cities, and in the face of chronic drought, people have been building huge structures here for thousands of years. Pre-Incan ruins abound, and 16th-century Spanish colonial architecture mingles with everything built before or since. Today the architecture and design scenes are especially vibrant.  Photo by: João Canziani

    Lima, Peru

    Though often shrouded in fog, Lima is one of the world’s driest cities, and in the face of chronic drought, people have been building huge structures here for thousands of years. Pre-Incan ruins abound, and 16th-century Spanish colonial architecture mingles with everything built before or since. Today the architecture and design scenes are especially vibrant.

    Photo by: João Canziani

  • 
  Santiago, ChileUnlike sizzling Rio de Janeiro or seductive Buenos Aires, Santiago comes off as South America’s more straitlaced capital city. Chile, the world’s longest country, stretching almost 2,700 miles from north to south, is packed with plenty of eye-catching landscapes, from the soaring Andes to the arid Atacama Desert. And it’s no wonder that visitors are easily lured away from sleepy Santiago.

    Santiago, Chile

    Unlike sizzling Rio de Janeiro or seductive Buenos Aires, Santiago comes off as South America’s more straitlaced capital city. Chile, the world’s longest country, stretching almost 2,700 miles from north to south, is packed with plenty of eye-catching landscapes, from the soaring Andes to the arid Atacama Desert. And it’s no wonder that visitors are easily lured away from sleepy Santiago.

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