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5 Latin American Design Destinations

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Should your summer travels take you south of the border, we've rounded up all the architecture and design hotspots in this quintet of Latin American city guides. From Mexico City to Lima, here's your cribsheet to the best our southern neighbors have to offer. Don't forget your passport.
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  To call São Paulo—the largest city in Brazil and one of the largest in the world—overwhelming is an understatement. To help you navigate this teeming megalopolis, we've pulled together some resources from Dwell.com for the design-minded traveler. Photo by Cristobal Palma.

    To call São Paulo—the largest city in Brazil and one of the largest in the world—overwhelming is an understatement. To help you navigate this teeming megalopolis, we've pulled together some resources from Dwell.com for the design-minded traveler. Photo by Cristobal Palma.

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  Don't skip Buenos Aires, the most exciting city in Argentina. MALBA, designed by Argentine architects Gastón Atelman, Martín Fourcade, and Alfredo Tapia houses Eduardo Costantini’s significant collection of art works from Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Chile, Mexico, and Venezuela.

    Don't skip Buenos Aires, the most exciting city in Argentina. MALBA, designed by Argentine architects Gastón Atelman, Martín Fourcade, and Alfredo Tapia houses Eduardo Costantini’s significant collection of art works from Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Chile, Mexico, and Venezuela.

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  In Lima, Peru–a visually striking but geologically shaky locale–designer Jodi Puig points out ways in which the city's culturally rich past provides a solid foundation for its design future. The massive Huaca Pucllana is just one of many examples of the pre-Incan architecture that dots Lima. This complex burial structure was built some 1,500 years ago. Photo by: João Canziani  Photo by: João Canziani

    In Lima, Peru–a visually striking but geologically shaky locale–designer Jodi Puig points out ways in which the city's culturally rich past provides a solid foundation for its design future. The massive Huaca Pucllana is just one of many examples of the pre-Incan architecture that dots Lima. This complex burial structure was built some 1,500 years ago. Photo by: João Canziani

    Photo by: João Canziani

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  Gallery owner Hilario Galguera escorts us through Mexico City, walking the line of life and death, problem and promise. Juan O’Gorman’s 1953 library at UNAM (National Autonomous University of Mexico) grafts pre-Hispanic-themed mosaic art onto a modernist structure. Photo by: Livia Corona   Photo by: Livia Corona

    Gallery owner Hilario Galguera escorts us through Mexico City, walking the line of life and death, problem and promise. Juan O’Gorman’s 1953 library at UNAM (National Autonomous University of Mexico) grafts pre-Hispanic-themed mosaic art onto a modernist structure. Photo by: Livia Corona

     

    Photo by: Livia Corona

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  Santiago, Chile, may be a tamer city than its South American brethren, but as architect Sebastián Irarrázaval tells us, there's change afoot where colonial legacy meets modern urban design.The west side of Plaza de Armas reveals Santiago’s juxtaposition of old and new. The Plaza de Armas building, a mirrored glass edifice by Echenique Cruz Boisier Arquitectos, rises above the grand Catedral Metropolitana. The cathedral’s main altar was recently renovated, and many Santiago luminaries are buried on the church’s site. Photo by: Cristóbal Palma  Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

    Santiago, Chile, may be a tamer city than its South American brethren, but as architect Sebastián Irarrázaval tells us, there's change afoot where colonial legacy meets modern urban design.The west side of Plaza de Armas reveals Santiago’s juxtaposition of old and new. The Plaza de Armas building, a mirrored glass edifice by Echenique Cruz Boisier Arquitectos, rises above the grand Catedral Metropolitana. The cathedral’s main altar was recently renovated, and many Santiago luminaries are buried on the church’s site. Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

    Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

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