The 404: Nashville's Newest, Smallest, Hotel

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April 2, 2014
In a section of Nashville increasingly defined by large high-rise developments and national chains, a new boutique hotel and restaurant stays deliberately small and local. Read Full Article
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  The 404 is a new boutique hotel and restaurant in Nashville’s rapidly changing Gulch neighborhood. Housed in a former auto shop next to the legendary Station Inn music venue, the small space stands in stark contrast to the new, large developments that have recently sprung up. The restaurant in front is partially housed in a shipping container that both extends the entry up to the sidewalk and acts as a visual focal point on an otherwise subdued exterior. Photo by Caroline Allison.
    The 404 is a new boutique hotel and restaurant in Nashville’s rapidly changing Gulch neighborhood. Housed in a former auto shop next to the legendary Station Inn music venue, the small space stands in stark contrast to the new, large developments that have recently sprung up. The restaurant in front is partially housed in a shipping container that both extends the entry up to the sidewalk and acts as a visual focal point on an otherwise subdued exterior. Photo by Caroline Allison.
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  The restaurant, which opened in late 2013, has already received national attention for its menu. The 404’s local emphasis is carried throughout the both the hotel and the restaurant, which serves dishes made from ingredients that are sourced locally or grown from the rooftop herb garden. The tabletops are repurposed from the original floor of the shipping container. Photo by Caroline Allison.
    The restaurant, which opened in late 2013, has already received national attention for its menu. The 404’s local emphasis is carried throughout the both the hotel and the restaurant, which serves dishes made from ingredients that are sourced locally or grown from the rooftop herb garden. The tabletops are repurposed from the original floor of the shipping container. Photo by Caroline Allison.
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  The hotel bedrooms are an eclectic mix of local antiques and modern furnishings. Much of the furniture, including beds and wardrobes were designed and manufactured by architect Nick Dryden, allowing them to be customized for the rooms. Lighting in the rooms is by Artemide and Pablo. Photo by Caroline Allison

    The hotel bedrooms are an eclectic mix of local antiques and modern furnishings. Much of the furniture, including beds and wardrobes were designed and manufactured by architect Nick Dryden, allowing them to be customized for the rooms. Lighting in the rooms is by Artemide and Pablo. Photo by Caroline Allison

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  Because owner Mark Banks and architect Nick Dryden wanted to preserve as much of the original structure as possible, they faced the challenge of creating a comfortable space within a small footprint. The solution was to take advantage of the existing structure's 23-foot ceilings, and create lofts in the bedrooms. Photo by Caroline Allison.
    Because owner Mark Banks and architect Nick Dryden wanted to preserve as much of the original structure as possible, they faced the challenge of creating a comfortable space within a small footprint. The solution was to take advantage of the existing structure's 23-foot ceilings, and create lofts in the bedrooms. Photo by Caroline Allison.
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  An intimate hotel lobby provides additional relaxation space for guests. Because the hotel has only five rooms, it is not uncommon for large groups or touring bands book the entire hotel, turning the space into a de facto living room. A PIXO desk lamp sits on the lobby desk next to the antique couch. Photo by Caroline Allison.

    An intimate hotel lobby provides additional relaxation space for guests. Because the hotel has only five rooms, it is not uncommon for large groups or touring bands book the entire hotel, turning the space into a de facto living room. A PIXO desk lamp sits on the lobby desk next to the antique couch. Photo by Caroline Allison.

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  The bathrooms are stocked with Malin + Goetz toiletries and towels from the Nashville linen maker Turkish-T. The walk-in showers are lined with white subway tile. Photo by Caroline Allison.

    The bathrooms are stocked with Malin + Goetz toiletries and towels from the Nashville linen maker Turkish-T. The walk-in showers are lined with white subway tile. Photo by Caroline Allison.

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