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April 8, 2014
With Milan Design Week in full swing, we take a look at some of our favorite Italian homes.
Though it’s inside, this light-filled room allows for a nearly alfresco dining experience. 
The Fucsia pendant lamps are by Achille Castiglioni. The couch in the living area is by Antonio Citterio.

The light-filled central room of this Tuscan home allows for a nearly alfresco dining experience. The Fucsia pendant lamps are by Achille Castiglioni. The couch in the living area is by Antonio Citterio. Photo by Jacob Langvad.

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Originally appeared in Somewhere Under the Tuscan Sun
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Modern office space Eames lounge chair

This modern home in Northern Italy matches warm colors of dark wood with the sleek minimalism of white seating. Near the sofa by Piero Lissoni for Cassina is a Bourgie lamp from Kartell; on the large table, made from old roof beams, is a Taccia lamp from Flos. Photo by Helenio Barbetta.

 
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Originally appeared in A Renovated Farmhouse in Northern Italy
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white couch white loft dark wood floors

In the seating area of this Umbrian home, a trolley found at a flea market functions as a coffee table alongside an expansive Navone–designed sofa for Linteloo. Custom pendants by photographer Mark Eden Schooley hang above the dining table. Photo by Wichmann + Bendtsen.

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Originally appeared in A Converted Factory Building in Italy
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Combined bathroom and bedroom suite

This spacious residence in northern Italy was once a farmhouse. “This was a farmer’s house, and they stored crops here,” says the resident, Guido Chiavelli. “We knew right away this was the spot that we wanted to have our own room.” Photo by Helenio Barbetta.

 
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Originally appeared in A Renovated Farmhouse in Northern Italy
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For the floors of this spacious Umbrian home, interior designer Paola Navone used hexagonal Carocim tiles of her own design. Photo by Wichmann + Bendtsen.

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Originally appeared in Paola Navone's Industrial Style Renovation in Italy
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Podere 43 allows for an endless array of leisure activities like ping-pong.

The connection between inside and outside spaces was a central guiding thought in the design of this Tuscan home. Photo by Jacob Langvad.

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Originally appeared in Somewhere Under the Tuscan Sun
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Though it’s inside, this light-filled room allows for a nearly alfresco dining experience. 
The Fucsia pendant lamps are by Achille Castiglioni. The couch in the living area is by Antonio Citterio.

The light-filled central room of this Tuscan home allows for a nearly alfresco dining experience. The Fucsia pendant lamps are by Achille Castiglioni. The couch in the living area is by Antonio Citterio. Photo by Jacob Langvad.

Photo by Jacob Langvad.

Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe, currently on view at the Guggenheim Museum in New York, is a celebration of the revolutionary artists and architects who wanted to burn down old Italian institutions so a new culture could rise from their ashes. Rather than accept this negative view of tradition, later generations of Italian designers took an entirely different approach and decided to build on the rich history of their country. The results of combining tradition with edgy modernity are nowhere more succesful than in contemporary Italian interior design. Here is a look at some creative Italian interiors from the Dwell archives. 

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