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October 30, 2013
Latin America's design scene is heating up, from artisan-made goods making their way to US department stores to the massive architecture projects going up in advance of the World Cup and Olympic Games. These homes from the Dwell archives represent some of the southern hemisphere's best residential modernism. And don't forget to check out our city guides on Lima, Mexico City, Buenos Aires, Santiago, and São Paolo.
José Roberto, who says his family is always cooking something, prepares a snack with Jimena on the Ariston gas cooktop installed on the custom table.

In Central America, Spanish colonial architecture prevails. But the creeping tide of modernism—represented here by the home of architect José Roberto Paredes—is signaling that change is afoot. Paredes gives us a tour of his house, set in the rain forest outside San Salvador, El Salvador. Photo by Paco Perez.

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Originally appeared in Welcome to the Jungle
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São Paulo architect Isay Weinfeld's Casa Deck offers cinematic vistas, a lush garden, and a retreat from Brazil's largest city. A wooden partition separates the dining room from the living room. The jacaranda table is a vintage find designed by Jorge Zalszupin for L’Atelier, the dining chairs are by the Brazilian designer Sergio Rodrigues, and architect Isay Weinfeld designed the sideboard. Photo by Matthew Williams.

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Originally appeared in Cinematic Family Retreat in Brazil
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The living room resembles a Sticotti furniture showroom: The architect designed the couch, coffee tables, and stumplike stools. The fireplace is made of stacked stone from San Juan, a nearby province.

Argentinean materials, a roiling economy, and a pinch of personal tumult served as the recipe for furniture designer Alejandro Sticotti’s Buenos Aires oasis. The living room resembles a Sticotti furniture showroom: The architect designed the couch, coffee tables, and stumplike stools. The fireplace is made of stacked stone from San Juan, a nearby province. Photo by Cristóbal Palma.

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Originally appeared in Net Assets
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Modern courtyard with glazed walls and stacked concrete forms

Seeking a way to blend architecture into the natural environment, a pair of Ecuador-based designers invents a new modular building system. Once past the main threshold, the house opens up to the outside, literally and figuratively. Three courtyards built around existing trees flow seamlessly into a series of rooms with glazed walls and sliding glass doors. Photo by João Canziani.

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Courtesy of 
Joao Canziani
Originally appeared in An Innovative Modular Building System in Ecuador
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The dining area feels like an extension of the pool, with water channels on two sides.

This renovated home in San Juan, Puerto Rico (completed on a budget of $400,000!), has a graceful way of folding the past into the present. The owners kept the original floor tiles, a local design with a muted geometric pattern known as isleño, while architect Nataniel Fúster designed a new tile with complementary tones and a slightly more active pattern for the open living area and other additions. Photo by Raimund Koch.

 

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Originally appeared in San Juan, PR
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modern house in el salvador with creative roofing

A green house near the coast of El Salvador captures the best of its naturally striking setting—filled with sunlight, invigorating breezes, and sweeping views of lush woodlands. Photo by Jason Bax.

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Originally appeared in Striking Green House with a View in El Salvador
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For photographer Reinaldo Cóser and his family of four, the best way to deal with the sometimes-draining throb of massive São Paulo was to simply rise above. By keeping the front and back gardens at the same elevation as the living area, architect Marcio Kogan created one giant living space. A large overhang means that even on a rainy day, the Cósers can live practically without walls. Photo by Cristóbal Palma.

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José Roberto, who says his family is always cooking something, prepares a snack with Jimena on the Ariston gas cooktop installed on the custom table.

In Central America, Spanish colonial architecture prevails. But the creeping tide of modernism—represented here by the home of architect José Roberto Paredes—is signaling that change is afoot. Paredes gives us a tour of his house, set in the rain forest outside San Salvador, El Salvador. Photo by Paco Perez.

Photo by Paco Perez.

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