written by:
December 8, 2009

Design Miami wrapped up on Sunday, and all told I’d say the fair was a mixed bag. Though I tend to have a good time wandering the aisles of Aranda\Lasch’s temporary tent taking in the latest and greatest of the world of one-off, rare and limited-edition design, there did appear to be a bit more filler this year than last.

Greg Lynn designed a massive, color-changing installation for Swarovski that sat between the VIP lounge and the bathrooms.

Greg Lynn designed a massive, color-changing installation for Swarovski that sat between the VIP lounge and the bathrooms.

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This bed is from designer Peter Marigold's Palindrome Series.

This bed is from designer Peter Marigold's Palindrome Series.

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The headboard of the bed by Peter Marigold shows his flowery visual signature.

The headboard of the bed by Peter Marigold shows his flowery visual signature.

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Here is a table and bench from Peter Marigold's Palindrome Series shown by the New York City gallery Moss.

Here is a table and bench from Peter Marigold's Palindrome Series shown by the New York City gallery Moss.

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The best collection of the show was the 2009 Palindrome Series by Peter Marigold shown by the gallery Moss.

The best collection of the show was the 2009 Palindrome Series by Peter Marigold shown by the gallery Moss.

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French designer Francois Azambourg's prototype lamp Sputnik was one of my favorites.

French designer Francois Azambourg's prototype lamp Sputnik was one of my favorites.

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These bright blocks and non-functioning ladders came from artist Ben Jones shown by Johnson Trading Gallery.

These bright blocks and non-functioning ladders came from artist Ben Jones shown by Johnson Trading Gallery.

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Artist and designer Ben Jones added a much-needed dash of color to Design Miami with his Beehaven collection.

Artist and designer Ben Jones added a much-needed dash of color to Design Miami with his Beehaven collection.

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This dog-shaped bench from Ben Jones was the only functional piece of work he showed.

This dog-shaped bench from Ben Jones was the only functional piece of work he showed.

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The first thing that caught my eye entering the tent was Lotty Lindeman's Tassenkast collection of luggage.

The first thing that caught my eye entering the tent was Lotty Lindeman's Tassenkast collection of luggage.

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Imagined as tiny cabinets, Lotty Lindeman's Tassenkast luggage was portable, charming and all hand-made.

Imagined as tiny cabinets, Lotty Lindeman's Tassenkast luggage was portable, charming and all hand-made.

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The temporary tent that housed Design Miami this year was designed by the New York firm Aranda\Lasch.

The temporary tent that housed Design Miami this year was designed by the New York firm Aranda\Lasch.

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Greg Lynn designed a massive, color-changing installation for Swarovski that sat between the VIP lounge and the bathrooms.

Greg Lynn designed a massive, color-changing installation for Swarovski that sat between the VIP lounge and the bathrooms.

The tent itself appeared to be the same size, though this year a stage and rows of chairs, as well as a performance space (where rockers OK GO performed with an utterly silly set of furry, laser-shooting instruments by the fashionistas at Fendi) took up some of the floor space. Last year the stage was in a building across the street, though when I popped my head in there last week it was being used as a gallery displaying the brand of Miami-approved, glossy/porny cheesecake photography that just barely walks the line between fine art and testimonial for adventurous waxing techniques. 

I didn’t quite know what to make of Greg Lynn’s installation Crystal Palace for Swarovski. It consisted of several massive sails suspended from the ceiling like some great, frozen jellyfish. As the sails slowly changed colors they were fairly mesmerizing, though I couldn’t quite get past the fact that the whole thing looked like a high-tech sun visor you might find in the windshield of any parked car. His HSBC Private Lounge fared better, a spiky white affair whose vaguely menacing, razorlike wall reminded those outside it who the real VIPs are. I was told by a particularly vigilant doorkeeper that, once I was through looking at Arik Levy’s installation inside, that I would need “to be removed.” A press pass ain’t what it used to be.

Despite a smaller number of exhibitors, I did see a handful of objects that I really liked. So in the interest of giving credit where it is certainly due, here’s a curated look at my four favorites of this year’s Design Miami show.A Passion for Tassenkast

The object that first caught my eye came from the 29 year-old Dutch designer Lotty Lindeman. Her two groups of artfully made luggage called Tassenkast (“tassen” literally means “cabinet”) were hung on two of the walls of the Heusden, Netherlands gallery Priveekillektie. Made of cherry wood and hand-stitched by Lindeman, these cases struck me as the perfect antidote to all the ballistic nylon that presently keeps us travelers in order. She prototyped the design for Lloyd’s Hotel in Amsterdam, but now offers a set of three for $6,500 and a set of seven for $14,000. I wonder if you can earn any miles if you buy a set.

Color Me Glad

Though I didn’t realize it until I’d walked the entire showfloor, but Design Miami was a rather chromatically dull affair this year. Shades of brown carried the day as wood trumped slicker stuff like plastic and resin, though there was one major exception to this drab rule: the work of RISD-trained artist Ben Jones. Jones’s first design collection was shown by Johnson Trading Gallery of New York City, and its bright, neon colors were a welcome burst of excitement. Though the objects in his Beehaven series were treated more like art pieces than furniture proper—only the dog-shaped bench was functional—their whimsy was utterly charming. I was told that Beehaven is the name of Jones’ grandfather’s summer home, and that the dog/bench is the protagonist of a massive graphic novel he’s been composing.

Red Zeppelin

I’ll confess it right now. I fell for a prototype. No, it’s not in production, but god willing it will be soon. This charming little lamp, dubbed Sputnik, is from French designer Francois Azambourg and was show by Gallery R’Pure. Azambourg won the Designer Prize at the Paris Furniture Fair this year, and this luminous little guy, no more than 18” high shows why. I also fell for the desk from his Villa Rose Collection, but the 400 LED lights inside this airship, alongside its skeletal frame, had it rising in my esteem. So Vitra, Capellini, hell, Target, wake up and make this damned lamp, already.

(Nothing but) Flowers

The final entry into my list of favorite is British designer Peter Marigold’s 2009 Palindrome series. Comprised of a table, bed, bench, nightstand, and (sheesh!) and gun cabinet, New York gallery Moss’s collection of Marigold’s work had me wandering past more than once. Half of each object is made of humble plywood, and the other half is a cast of the first, rendered in white gypsum. Nailed together, they form mirror images of each other, and thus have been dubbed the Palindrome series. A rebuke to slickness, the Palindrome family is rough hewn work, a fact celebrated by it’s double-form. Each object has an appropriately palindromic name as well, such as “Kayak, Civic, Hannah,” and, improbably, “Mr Owl Ate My Metal Worm.” Call me forward-thinking or backward-looking, I was a fan. 

 

To see more images from Design Miami, please visit our slideshow.
 

 

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