Advertising
Advertising

You are here

Factory Direct

+ Read Article

Ask anybody who has held so much as a bud vase from Heath Ceramics about the pottery’s charms, and you’re likely to encounter the kind of adoration reserved for treasured family heirlooms. So great is the ubiquitous enthusiasm for Heath that one is left wondering if something more than pigment is baked into its signature glazes. Its popularity may stem from its timeless, unfussy quality—–a Heath piece looks equally at home alongside decor of any epoch. But more likely it is due to the fact that in an era dominated by the rise of machines, this small company has honed a homespun, handcrafted approach to stoneware that’s tangible in each tile, serving bowl, and pitcher that comes out of its Sausalito, California, kilns.

  • 
  Heath’s Sausalito factory was purpose-built for Edith Heath. The original kilns and equipment are still being used at the behest of owners Cathy Bailey and Robin Petravic.  Photo by Dustin Aksland.
    Heath’s Sausalito factory was purpose-built for Edith Heath. The original kilns and equipment are still being used at the behest of owners Cathy Bailey and Robin Petravic. Photo by Dustin Aksland.
  • 
  Stacks of unglazed dishware line the shelves at the Heath factory in Sausalito.  Photo by Dustin Aksland.
    Stacks of unglazed dishware line the shelves at the Heath factory in Sausalito. Photo by Dustin Aksland.
  • 
  A short ferry ride across the Bay, the San Francisco Ferry Building is the latest location for Heath to display its colorful wares.  Photo by Dustin Aksland.
    A short ferry ride across the Bay, the San Francisco Ferry Building is the latest location for Heath to display its colorful wares. Photo by Dustin Aksland.
  • 
  Tableware shares space with a curated collection of books, tea towels, and treasures for the home.  Photo by Dustin Aksland.
    Tableware shares space with a curated collection of books, tea towels, and treasures for the home. Photo by Dustin Aksland.
  • 
  The Ferry Building shop displays seasonal goods as well as items from some of Heath’s most popular collections. The top shelf here features serve bowls, platters, modern cups, bud vases, and a pitcher from this year’s Summer line in aqua/zest and ocean pacific. Heath worked with chef Alice Waters and designer Christina Kim to create the Chez Panisse line, named after the famed Berkeley restaurant, which is seen here on the second shelf: side bowls, mugs, and café bowls in Jicama, Cardoon, and Forrest. The backsplash is Heath dual glaze tile.  Photo by Dustin Aksland.
    The Ferry Building shop displays seasonal goods as well as items from some of Heath’s most popular collections. The top shelf here features serve bowls, platters, modern cups, bud vases, and a pitcher from this year’s Summer line in aqua/zest and ocean pacific. Heath worked with chef Alice Waters and designer Christina Kim to create the Chez Panisse line, named after the famed Berkeley restaurant, which is seen here on the second shelf: side bowls, mugs, and café bowls in Jicama, Cardoon, and Forrest. The backsplash is Heath dual glaze tile. Photo by Dustin Aksland.
  • 
  A tableau of tableware at the Ferry Building location shows the range of glaze options and styles of stoneware available. This year’s summer collection is featured on the top shelf, above platters, mugs, bowls, and a small teapot from the traditional Coupe line on the second shelf from the top. Dessert bowls, salt and pepper shakers, pitchers, pasta bowls and more round out the display.  Photo by Dustin Aksland.
    A tableau of tableware at the Ferry Building location shows the range of glaze options and styles of stoneware available. This year’s summer collection is featured on the top shelf, above platters, mugs, bowls, and a small teapot from the traditional Coupe line on the second shelf from the top. Dessert bowls, salt and pepper shakers, pitchers, pasta bowls and more round out the display. Photo by Dustin Aksland.
  • 
  A close-up of cream & sugar in aqua and moonstone, salt & pepper in moonstone, and bowls in matte brown and burch.  Photo by Dustin Aksland.
    A close-up of cream & sugar in aqua and moonstone, salt & pepper in moonstone, and bowls in matte brown and burch. Photo by Dustin Aksland.
  • 
  A multi-hued sea of serve bowls in the San Francisco Ferry Building shop.  Photo by Dustin Aksland.
    A multi-hued sea of serve bowls in the San Francisco Ferry Building shop. Photo by Dustin Aksland.
  • 
  The Sausalito factory store has shelves full of tile samples, so visitors can check out the wide variety of glazing options available.  Photo by Dustin Aksland.
    The Sausalito factory store has shelves full of tile samples, so visitors can check out the wide variety of glazing options available. Photo by Dustin Aksland.
  • 
  Racks of bisque dinnerware in the Sausalito factory before they become the bright and beautiful pieces that line the shop shelves.  Photo by Dustin Aksland.
    Racks of bisque dinnerware in the Sausalito factory before they become the bright and beautiful pieces that line the shop shelves. Photo by Dustin Aksland.
  • 
  Like an archaeological site, remains of stoneware can be found in the recycled clay from the Sausalito factory.  Photo by Dustin Aksland.
    Like an archaeological site, remains of stoneware can be found in the recycled clay from the Sausalito factory. Photo by Dustin Aksland.
  • 
  A cart full of recycled clay.  Photo by Dustin Aksland.
    A cart full of recycled clay. Photo by Dustin Aksland.

@current / @total

More

Add comment

By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.
Advertising
Close
Try Dwell Risk-Free!
Yes! Send me a RISK-FREE issue of Dwell. If I like it I'll pay only $14.95 for one year (10 issues in all).