An Arctic White Kitchen Renovation in Connecticut

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January 28, 2014
Originally published in Bright Interiors
as
Make it Grain
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  To complement the white-washed custom cabinetry in her kitchen, architect Julie Salles Schaffer designed a tile backsplash to resemble “melting butter in a white pan”. Daltile arranged her two-color AutoCAD design—white and off-white—onto a mesh backing for a small fee. To soften the edges of the cabinets’ drawers and doors, Schaffer requested radial edging.    This originally appeared in How to Design with White.
    To complement the white-washed custom cabinetry in her kitchen, architect Julie Salles Schaffer designed a tile backsplash to resemble “melting butter in a white pan”. Daltile arranged her two-color AutoCAD design—white and off-white—onto a mesh backing for a small fee. To soften the edges of the cabinets’ drawers and doors, Schaffer requested radial edging.
    This originally appeared in How to Design with White.
  • 
  The kitchen is stocked with storage niches for cups and everyday plates. Unloading the dishwasher is a family affair for the architect, her husband, Robert, and two teenage daughters.
    The kitchen is stocked with storage niches for cups and everyday plates. Unloading the dishwasher is a family affair for the architect, her husband, Robert, and two teenage daughters.
  • 
  Cabinet fabricator Michael Madore experimented with what he calls an “aggressive” metal-sanding process to pull out the grain from the whitewashed oak plywood. For the hardware-free cabinets, Schaffer looked to a drawer pull detail derived from Giò Ponti’s work—though she admits the radial edging is an effect entirely her own.
    Cabinet fabricator Michael Madore experimented with what he calls an “aggressive” metal-sanding process to pull out the grain from the whitewashed oak plywood. For the hardware-free cabinets, Schaffer looked to a drawer pull detail derived from Giò Ponti’s work—though she admits the radial edging is an effect entirely her own.
  • 
  Schaffer’s two teenage daughters tend to gather in the kitchen, particularly on the custom-made ladder fabricated by Index-d. Joking about having her immediate family as clients, the architect says, “I was faced with a much more discerning and critical audience. To lure my kids away from Instagram and Snapchat, the house had to have form and function meeting fun.” To incorporate every family member into the planning of the space, Schaffer allotted niches for dish storage (like the girls’ set of Pantone mugs) and a pull-out pantry at eye-level.
    Schaffer’s two teenage daughters tend to gather in the kitchen, particularly on the custom-made ladder fabricated by Index-d. Joking about having her immediate family as clients, the architect says, “I was faced with a much more discerning and critical audience. To lure my kids away from Instagram and Snapchat, the house had to have form and function meeting fun.” To incorporate every family member into the planning of the space, Schaffer allotted niches for dish storage (like the girls’ set of Pantone mugs) and a pull-out pantry at eye-level.
  • 
  New York City-based Schaffer built the house in Guilford on a tight budget, since it’s currently her family’s second home. As an architect, she had say over where the kitchen, the heart of the abode, was situated. "I can see the pool, and when I'm cooking something, I can still see the kids.” It’s the main point of egress to the back patio and has the best view of the Long Island Sound.
    New York City-based Schaffer built the house in Guilford on a tight budget, since it’s currently her family’s second home. As an architect, she had say over where the kitchen, the heart of the abode, was situated. "I can see the pool, and when I'm cooking something, I can still see the kids.” It’s the main point of egress to the back patio and has the best view of the Long Island Sound.
  • 
  The basic idea for the house is a simple wooden box which Schaffer "manipulated to the maximum degree,” creating "solid and void where light and views of the rocky shoreline of the Long Island Sound could be drawn inside.” Large windows are installed flush to the siding for a seamless effect.
    The basic idea for the house is a simple wooden box which Schaffer "manipulated to the maximum degree,” creating "solid and void where light and views of the rocky shoreline of the Long Island Sound could be drawn inside.” Large windows are installed flush to the siding for a seamless effect.
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