8 Idiosyncratic Bedrooms

written by:
January 7, 2014
When it comes to bedroom design, there is a healthy debate among designers and architects: Some say never go white (too antiseptic); some say never go dark (too gloomy). We hope these highly variable and inspirational designs will lead you to one clear answer: Go with what works for you.
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  A brilliant white floor allows the smallest hints of neon color to pop in this Scandinavian bedroom. Bright white makes even small rooms look spacious, and employing one color throughout keeps costs down for a bedroom overhaul. (For this 660-square-foot apartment in Helsinki, desinger Susanna Vento renovated the entire space for less than $4,000.) Photo by Petra Bindel.  Courtesy of: Petra Bindel

    A brilliant white floor allows the smallest hints of neon color to pop in this Scandinavian bedroom. Bright white makes even small rooms look spacious, and employing one color throughout keeps costs down for a bedroom overhaul. (For this 660-square-foot apartment in Helsinki, desinger Susanna Vento renovated the entire space for less than $4,000.) Photo by Petra Bindel.

    Courtesy of: Petra Bindel

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  An artist and a designer turned an old Toronto storefront in Dundas West into their home and studio. The bedroom is indicative of their colorful, laidback approach: A seating area includes vintage lounge chairs, a Bedouin rug purchased in Jerusalem, and Artemide lighting: Vintage Eclisse table lamps by Vico Magistretti hang over the nightstands and a Tizio table lamp by Richard Sapper rests on a side table. Photo by Naomi Finlay.  Photo by: Naomi Finlay

    An artist and a designer turned an old Toronto storefront in Dundas West into their home and studio. The bedroom is indicative of their colorful, laidback approach: A seating area includes vintage lounge chairs, a Bedouin rug purchased in Jerusalem, and Artemide lighting: Vintage Eclisse table lamps by Vico Magistretti hang over the nightstands and a Tizio table lamp by Richard Sapper rests on a side table. Photo by Naomi Finlay.

    Photo by: Naomi Finlay

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  The white linens appear almost ghostly against the natural grain of the knotty pine wood of this architect's home in snowy Sweden. Photo by Pia Ulin.  Photo by: Pia Ulin

    The white linens appear almost ghostly against the natural grain of the knotty pine wood of this architect's home in snowy Sweden. Photo by Pia Ulin.

    Photo by: Pia Ulin

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  This modern art and design gallerist's residence sports a panoply of color and shapes--except for in the bedroom, where cool grays and serene sculpture create a sense of museum-like quiet. Photo by Tim Van de Velde.  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    This modern art and design gallerist's residence sports a panoply of color and shapes--except for in the bedroom, where cool grays and serene sculpture create a sense of museum-like quiet. Photo by Tim Van de Velde.

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  With a steel frame, a private aerie in Johannesburg is elevated in more ways than one. In the bedroom, floor-to-ceiling glass doors slide open without any columns in the corner to block the views of the tree canopy below. Photo by Elsa Young.  Courtesy of: Elsa Young

    With a steel frame, a private aerie in Johannesburg is elevated in more ways than one. In the bedroom, floor-to-ceiling glass doors slide open without any columns in the corner to block the views of the tree canopy below. Photo by Elsa Young.

    Courtesy of: Elsa Young

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  A tiny room in a 240-square-foot apartment in New York City becomes workable thanks to a disciplined approach. Architect Tim Seggerman says he approached this tiny renovation as "essentially an open wooden boat," adding in storage and built-ins for every square inch. Photo by David Engelhardt.  Photo by: David Engelhardt

    A tiny room in a 240-square-foot apartment in New York City becomes workable thanks to a disciplined approach. Architect Tim Seggerman says he approached this tiny renovation as "essentially an open wooden boat," adding in storage and built-ins for every square inch. Photo by David Engelhardt.

    Photo by: David Engelhardt

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  Tucked into corners or folded into walls, hideaway beds accommodate last minute guests and open up potentially cramped spaces. The library and office transforms into a guest bedroom in Dr. Kenneth Montague’s apartment in Toronto. Photo by Naomi Finlay.  Photo by: Naomi FinlayCourtesy of: © 2012 Naomi Finlay

    Tucked into corners or folded into walls, hideaway beds accommodate last minute guests and open up potentially cramped spaces. The library and office transforms into a guest bedroom in Dr. Kenneth Montague’s apartment in Toronto. Photo by Naomi Finlay.

    Photo by: Naomi Finlay

    Courtesy of: © 2012 Naomi Finlay

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  Whatever the approach, make it cozy! In industrial designer Omer Arbel's Vancouver bedroom, a light by Bretford in Chicago is next to an Ikea Malm bed topped with Indian linens and folk weavings. The rug is from Paola Lenti. A Bocci 19 brass bowl sits near a hamper from Connected Fair Trade Goods. Photo by José Mandojana.

    Whatever the approach, make it cozy! In industrial designer Omer Arbel's Vancouver bedroom, a light by Bretford in Chicago is next to an Ikea Malm bed topped with Indian linens and folk weavings. The rug is from Paola Lenti. A Bocci 19 brass bowl sits near a hamper from Connected Fair Trade Goods. Photo by José Mandojana.

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