August 12, 2014
Skylights come in all shapes and sizes, but their practicality is universal. These rooms feature a variety of overhead cut-outs that admit an abundance of natural light.
Modern concrete living room with skylights

Three protruding circular skylights, one of the most striking features of a renovated mid-century house in San Juan, are angled to shed morning and afternoon light on the spacious living room and adjacent lap pool.

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Originally appeared in San Juan, PR
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The master bathroom is softly lit by a skylight. The bath, by Laufen, is sunk into the floor to maintain a feeling of space.

The master bathroom of an architect’s home in Amsterdam features a skylight not in the middle of the ceiling, but around its edges. The resulting slivers of light spill down the walls and lend the space a soft glow.

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Originally appeared in Ship Shape
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clerestory window in modern cottage in connecticut

A renovated guesthouse in New Haven feels more spacious due in part to a raised portion of the ceiling, which not only provides more headroom but also lets in a stream of light through the resulting triangular skylight.

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Originally appeared in Striking Angular Cottage in Connecticut
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A Jutland, Denmark, house designed by Mette Nygaard and Morten Schmidt of the architecture firm Schmidt, Hammer & Lassen features a minimalist bathroom that's naturally lit with Plexiglass skylights. <a href="http://www.dwell.com/articles/cinematic-retrea

Architectural firm Schmidt, Hammer & Lassen filled the roof of a house in Denmark with circular Plexiglass skylights that allow sunlight to filter into the home’s minimalist spaces, including this concrete-encased bathroom.

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Originally appeared in Cinematic Retreat
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Multipurpose room with minimalist colors

Sunlight from a rectangular cutout in the ceiling of a tiny New York apartment streams down a custom Corian sculptural wall, brightening the space and creating an interesting play of light and shadow.

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Originally appeared in All Together Now
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Minimalist living room and kitchen

The interiors of a rectangular prefab home in Los Angeles are already bright, thanks to a central courtyard, but large circular skylights throughout the house admit additional light and offer glimpses of the sky.

Originally appeared in Looking Inward
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family dining in modern kitchen

The renovation of an old farmhouse in northern Italy was no small task due to irregular stonework and strict government regulations, but calculated decisions, such as a series of large skylights in the kitchen, helped make the space light and inviting, while still preserving the structure’s integrity.

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Originally appeared in A Renovated Farmhouse in Northern Italy
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Light-filled dining room and seating area

The greenhouse of a former fishermen’s cottage outside Copenhagen was converted into a dining room and sitting area, but four remaining skylights fill the space with plenty of natural light.

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Originally appeared in Light-Filled Family Home Renovation in Copenhagen
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Blue mosaic tile outdoor shower

The aquamarine bathroom of a San Francisco home features an expansive skylight that opens, allowing rain to drizzle onto the glass mosaic floor.

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Courtesy of 
justin fantl photography
Originally appeared in Just Redo It
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Eddy Uritani (or Uncle Eddy, as he’s known to Zane) did all the tile work in the kitchen and bathroom. The tiles come from a Canadian company called Interstyle.

An architect’s home in Kehena, Hawaii features a wood-clad and mosaic-tiled tub room, which is lit by a six-foot-wide circular skylight.

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Originally appeared in Go With the Flow
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Modern concrete living room with skylights

Three protruding circular skylights, one of the most striking features of a renovated mid-century house in San Juan, are angled to shed morning and afternoon light on the spacious living room and adjacent lap pool.

Photo by Raimund Koch.

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