Advertising
Advertising

You are here

10 Open-Plan Living Rooms

Read Article
Though open-plan spaces are the new norm, some—like the following 10 we hand-picked from our pages—clearly stand out from the rest.
  • 
  A 200-year-old factory in Umbria is transformed into an inviting home by designer Paola Navone. In the seating area, a trolley found at a flea market functions as the coffee table alongside an expansive Navone-designed sofa for Linteloo. Custom pendants by photographer Mark Eden Schooley hang above the dining table. Photo by Wichmann + Bendtsen.  Photo by: Wichmann + Bendtsen

    A 200-year-old factory in Umbria is transformed into an inviting home by designer Paola Navone. In the seating area, a trolley found at a flea market functions as the coffee table alongside an expansive Navone-designed sofa for Linteloo. Custom pendants by photographer Mark Eden Schooley hang above the dining table. Photo by Wichmann + Bendtsen.

    Photo by: Wichmann + Bendtsen

  • 
  In the Sydney, Australia, neighborhood of Rozelle, architect Christopher Polly renovated a house with green design in mind. The open-plan, double-height kitchen/living/dining area makes the most of the house's 1,700 square feet. Photo by Brett Boardman.   Photo by: Brett Boardman

    In the Sydney, Australia, neighborhood of Rozelle, architect Christopher Polly renovated a house with green design in mind. The open-plan, double-height kitchen/living/dining area makes the most of the house's 1,700 square feet. Photo by Brett Boardman. 

    Photo by: Brett Boardman

  • 
  Architect Piers Taylor's renovation of an old gameskeeper's cottage, complete with a castellated roof and sweeping meadow below, is an exercise in dramatic modernization. From the outside, the open living area appears to be a continuation of its natural surroundings. Photo by Ben Anders.   Photo by: Ben Anders

    Architect Piers Taylor's renovation of an old gameskeeper's cottage, complete with a castellated roof and sweeping meadow below, is an exercise in dramatic modernization. From the outside, the open living area appears to be a continuation of its natural surroundings. Photo by Ben Anders. 

    Photo by: Ben Anders

  • 
  Eero Saarinen’s legendary Miller House in Columbus, Indiana, was built for open-plan living. Photo by Leslie Williamson.   Photo by: Leslie Williamson

    Eero Saarinen’s legendary Miller House in Columbus, Indiana, was built for open-plan living. Photo by Leslie Williamson. 

    Photo by: Leslie Williamson

  • 
  When a Japanese couple asked architects Takaharu and Yui Tezuka to design a small home that would evoke the Italian love of food, informal gatherings, and natural settings, the result was la dolce vita in Tokyo. The entire interior wall opens, extending the house visually and socially into the small garden that lies between the multigenerational family’s two homes. The boys’ favorite feature is the soccer goalpost (which doubles as clothesline). Photo by Adam Friedberg.   Photo by: Adam Friedberg

    When a Japanese couple asked architects Takaharu and Yui Tezuka to design a small home that would evoke the Italian love of food, informal gatherings, and natural settings, the result was la dolce vita in Tokyo. The entire interior wall opens, extending the house visually and socially into the small garden that lies between the multigenerational family’s two homes. The boys’ favorite feature is the soccer goalpost (which doubles as clothesline). Photo by Adam Friedberg. 

    Photo by: Adam Friedberg

  • 
  Shane Blue of Bourne + Blue Architecture in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia, created a beachside family compound in Diamond Beach for James and Sue O’Sullivan. With five children visitng at any given time, an open-plan living area was a must. “My 23-year-old daughter has taken groups of university friends up for relaxing weekends,” says O’Sullivan. “And during school holidays I took my son Henry and five of his 16-year-old friends for a week of surfing, fishing, card games and mischief.” Photo by Simon Whitbread.   Photo by: Simon WhitbreadCourtesy of: Copyright Simon Whitbread

    Shane Blue of Bourne + Blue Architecture in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia, created a beachside family compound in Diamond Beach for James and Sue O’Sullivan. With five children visitng at any given time, an open-plan living area was a must. “My 23-year-old daughter has taken groups of university friends up for relaxing weekends,” says O’Sullivan. “And during school holidays I took my son Henry and five of his 16-year-old friends for a week of surfing, fishing, card games and mischief.” Photo by Simon Whitbread. 

    Photo by: Simon Whitbread

    Courtesy of: Copyright Simon Whitbread

  • 
  In this multigenerational Venice, California, home built by Modal Design principal Daniel Monti, the open-plan setup most definitely encourages running in the house. “The house plays two sides,” says Monti, “It becomes very formal, clean and cocktail party-ish, but at the same time when the grandchildren and my parents are in town, it’s toys everywhere and kids having fun, yelling at the top of their lungs.” Photo by Benny Chan.   Photo by: Benny Chan

    In this multigenerational Venice, California, home built by Modal Design principal Daniel Monti, the open-plan setup most definitely encourages running in the house. “The house plays two sides,” says Monti, “It becomes very formal, clean and cocktail party-ish, but at the same time when the grandchildren and my parents are in town, it’s toys everywhere and kids having fun, yelling at the top of their lungs.” Photo by Benny Chan. 

    Photo by: Benny Chan

  • 
  At the House of Earth + Light in Phoenix, one main space holds the living room, dining room, and office. In the office are Metropolitan chairs by Jeffrey Bernett for B&B Italia. Most artwork hung throughout the house comes from the resident’s art gallery. Photo by Daniel Hennessy.   Photo by: Daniel Hennessy

    At the House of Earth + Light in Phoenix, one main space holds the living room, dining room, and office. In the office are Metropolitan chairs by Jeffrey Bernett for B&B Italia. Most artwork hung throughout the house comes from the resident’s art gallery. Photo by Daniel Hennessy. 

    Photo by: Daniel Hennessy

  • 
  Massimo Iosa Ghini's Casa Fluida features an open layout of fluid space inspired by the "fluid city" of Memphis. Ghini, said to be the founder of Bolidism, traces an insightful line from the speed-obsessed movement's influence on Memphis design philosophy to the current culture.   Courtesy of: Justin Reid

    Massimo Iosa Ghini's Casa Fluida features an open layout of fluid space inspired by the "fluid city" of Memphis. Ghini, said to be the founder of Bolidism, traces an insightful line from the speed-obsessed movement's influence on Memphis design philosophy to the current culture. 

    Courtesy of: Justin Reid

  • 
  On a Maui mountaintop home by Dekleva Gregorič Arhitekti, a few steps allow the large living-dining area to have discrete areas for lounging and entertaining while keeping an open flow. Photo by Cristóbal Palma.   Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

    On a Maui mountaintop home by Dekleva Gregorič Arhitekti, a few steps allow the large living-dining area to have discrete areas for lounging and entertaining while keeping an open flow. Photo by Cristóbal Palma. 

    Photo by: Cristóbal Palma

@current / @total

More

Add comment

Log in or register to post comments
Advertising