10 Kitchens and Baths We Love

written by:
February 4, 2014
We've just hit the ground running at the mega-show that is KBIS/IBS, and we'll have a trend report for you soon. This got us thinking about our favorite kitchens and baths from our pages—have a look, stay tuned, and enjoy!
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  In this Helsinki renovation, the residents tore down the kitchen ceiling and wall cabinets with the help of Jussi’s father, a skilled craftsman. “Behind the cabinets we found lovely little nooks that work perfectly as shelves for things like salt and pepper mills. When you strip everything to its original state, you are able to see what the house is truly about.” 

    In this Helsinki renovation, the residents tore down the kitchen ceiling and wall cabinets with the help of Jussi’s father, a skilled craftsman. “Behind the cabinets we found lovely little nooks that work perfectly as shelves for things like salt and pepper mills. When you strip everything to its original state, you are able to see what the house is truly about.” 

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  Los Angeles–based architecture firm Tag Front faces the future of downtown living with an apartment that melds the compactness of a studio with the spaciousness of a loft and finds that, despite rumors to the contrary, size doesn’t matter. In the bathroom, the Stylo bar by Alu eliminates the need for space-eating cabinets by creating a vertical tower of platforms on which all the hygienic essentials rest. Generally used in retail displays, the Stylo stretches from floor to ceiling; platforms branch off at various intervals, creating resting spots for toilet paper, shaving gear, toothpaste, soap, and other necessities. The tub is built up from a rubberized plaster by Miracote and finished off with a woven fabric mesh and final layer of All-in-One coating, popular in prisons for its low price and durability. Photo by Baerbel Schmidt.   Photo by: Baerbel Schmidt

    Los Angeles–based architecture firm Tag Front faces the future of downtown living with an apartment that melds the compactness of a studio with the spaciousness of a loft and finds that, despite rumors to the contrary, size doesn’t matter. In the bathroom, the Stylo bar by Alu eliminates the need for space-eating cabinets by creating a vertical tower of platforms on which all the hygienic essentials rest. Generally used in retail displays, the Stylo stretches from floor to ceiling; platforms branch off at various intervals, creating resting spots for toilet paper, shaving gear, toothpaste, soap, and other necessities. The tub is built up from a rubberized plaster by Miracote and finished off with a woven fabric mesh and final layer of All-in-One coating, popular in prisons for its low price and durability. Photo by Baerbel Schmidt.

     

    Photo by: Baerbel Schmidt

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  Designer Barbara Hill applies her polished take on minimalism to a traditional 1920s abode in Atlanta for a transplanted Houston family. Hill had the overhead lighting in the kitchen customized by Rich Brilliant Willing in a pert orange that accents the primarily black-and-white interior scheme. She added a stainless steel kitchen island by Bulthaup, its glossiness and “clean feel” tempered by the plastic stacking stools designed by Konstantin Grcic for Magis. The cabinets, appliances, countertops, and marble tile were kept as-is, with the addition of several coats of white paint in order to blend seamlessly with the walls. Photo by Gregory Miller.   Photo by: Gregory Miller

    Designer Barbara Hill applies her polished take on minimalism to a traditional 1920s abode in Atlanta for a transplanted Houston family. Hill had the overhead lighting in the kitchen customized by Rich Brilliant Willing in a pert orange that accents the primarily black-and-white interior scheme. She added a stainless steel kitchen island by Bulthaup, its glossiness and “clean feel” tempered by the plastic stacking stools designed by Konstantin Grcic for Magis. The cabinets, appliances, countertops, and marble tile were kept as-is, with the addition of several coats of white paint in order to blend seamlessly with the walls. Photo by Gregory Miller.

     

    Photo by: Gregory Miller

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  Aaron Roberts and Thomas Bailey, the young architects behind room11, teamed up to design a house for Aaron's parents, fixing the structure into the topography of the site. The guest bathroom includes glass walls that look out onto one of the house’s “voids,” in which pear trees grow. Photo by Andrew Rowat .   Photo by: Andrew Rowat

    Aaron Roberts and Thomas Bailey, the young architects behind room11, teamed up to design a house for Aaron's parents, fixing the structure into the topography of the site. The guest bathroom includes glass walls that look out onto one of the house’s “voids,” in which pear trees grow. Photo by Andrew Rowat . 

    Photo by: Andrew Rowat

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  The budget was nearly as tight as the space in this cheerful renovation of a 516-square-foot flat in Bratislava. The centerpiece of Lukáš Kordík’s new kitchen is the cabinetry surrounding the sink, a feat he managed by altering the facing and pulls of an off-the-rack Ikea system. The laminate offers a good punch of blue, and in modernist fashion, Kordík forwent door handles in favor of cutouts. “I wanted the kitchen to be one simple block of color without any additional design,” he says. 

    The budget was nearly as tight as the space in this cheerful renovation of a 516-square-foot flat in Bratislava. The centerpiece of Lukáš Kordík’s new kitchen is the cabinetry surrounding the sink, a feat he managed by altering the facing and pulls of an off-the-rack Ikea system. The laminate offers a good punch of blue, and in modernist fashion, Kordík forwent door handles in favor of cutouts. “I wanted the kitchen to be one simple block of color without any additional design,” he says. 

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  When San Francisco–based architect Christi Azevedo and her partner bought an investment property in Oakland, what was billed in real estate listings as a 'detached garage' turned out to be a carriage house that dated from 1908. The bathroom was a "total scavenger project," says Azevedo. The flooring is a scrap of linoleum left over from another project, and the wall is clad in colorful strips of tongue-and-groove wood salvaged from the basement of the main house. "But we didn't cheap out: the toilet is a dual-flush Toto Aquia." Photo by Susanne Friedrich. 

    When San Francisco–based architect Christi Azevedo and her partner bought an investment property in Oakland, what was billed in real estate listings as a 'detached garage' turned out to be a carriage house that dated from 1908. The bathroom was a "total scavenger project," says Azevedo. The flooring is a scrap of linoleum left over from another project, and the wall is clad in colorful strips of tongue-and-groove wood salvaged from the basement of the main house. "But we didn't cheap out: the toilet is a dual-flush Toto Aquia." Photo by Susanne Friedrich.

     

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  Chelsea and Arthur Jackson renovated their fourth-floor condominium in Chicago to include a custom Bulthaup kitchen. Photo by Matthew Williams.   Photo by: Matthew Williams

    Chelsea and Arthur Jackson renovated their fourth-floor condominium in Chicago to include a custom Bulthaup kitchen. Photo by Matthew Williams. 

    Photo by: Matthew Williams

  • 
  On a shady street just off the main drag of Melbourne, Australia’s hippest inner suburb, a pair of creative types and their two kids have made a bright, cheery home by renovating an 1860s stable, oddly named “Villa Boston." Gorman and Angelucci make use of the en suite master bathroom that sits just behind their inexpensive walk-in closet with messmate facing. Photo by Stephen Oxenbury.  Photo by: Stephen Oxenbury

    On a shady street just off the main drag of Melbourne, Australia’s hippest inner suburb, a pair of creative types and their two kids have made a bright, cheery home by renovating an 1860s stable, oddly named “Villa Boston." Gorman and Angelucci make use of the en suite master bathroom that sits just behind their inexpensive walk-in closet with messmate facing. Photo by Stephen Oxenbury.

    Photo by: Stephen Oxenbury

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  When a couple in Amsterdam decided to upgrade their residence from a small houseboat to a larger one, they sought a design that would elevate the kitchen—literally. Set on the top floor and opening onto a large terrace, the airy room is the hub of the house(boat). Local carpenter Crisow von Schulz constructed the cabinets from a single elm tree. The organically curving lines were intended as a contrast to the rectilinear architecture of the houseboat. The ABK extractor unit allows maximum headroom and preserves the spacious feeling. Photo by Rene Mesman.   Photo by: Rene Mesman

    When a couple in Amsterdam decided to upgrade their residence from a small houseboat to a larger one, they sought a design that would elevate the kitchen—literally. Set on the top floor and opening onto a large terrace, the airy room is the hub of the house(boat). Local carpenter Crisow von Schulz constructed the cabinets from a single elm tree. The organically curving lines were intended as a contrast to the rectilinear architecture of the houseboat. The ABK extractor unit allows maximum headroom and preserves the spacious feeling. Photo by Rene Mesman.

     

    Photo by: Rene Mesman

  • 
  Though he appears to live alone, this graphically inclined Parisian commissioned an apartment that deftly houses his many roommates—scores of beloved comics—as well. To create a sense of visual connection, Vinciguerra and Santiard set a colored window in the bathroom, between two rooms. They spent days making sure that the green transparency would meld nicely with the shade of green on the kitchen shelves. Photo by Céline Clanet.   Photo by: Céline Clanet

    Though he appears to live alone, this graphically inclined Parisian commissioned an apartment that deftly houses his many roommates—scores of beloved comics—as well. To create a sense of visual connection, Vinciguerra and Santiard set a colored window in the bathroom, between two rooms. They spent days making sure that the green transparency would meld nicely with the shade of green on the kitchen shelves. Photo by Céline Clanet.

     

    Photo by: Céline Clanet

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