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January 14, 2014
Food, like design, is a key factor of everyday life. Not everyone appreciates food and design with fervor, but at Dwell, we recognize the importance of both. Part one of our Kitchens We Love series focuses on how to use wood for maximum effect.
The kitchen, complete with an Aga stove, is framed by modular shelves and helps heat the sleeping nook directly above it.

On a rocky island in Maine's Penobscot Bay is a rugged, barn-inspired retreat with a U-shape kitchen that architect Christopher Campbell devised as a workshop. "The end result is a clean and somewhat elegant space in which you could just as easily plate a dinner for 20 as rebuild a carburetor," he says. Cabinetry is made of pine; flooring is Douglar fir; and wall paneling is made of Russian spruce. Photo by Raimund Koch.

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Originally appeared in A Northern Haven
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A 13-foot-long island in the kitchen, finished in the same white terrazzo as the floor, serves as an informal dining area. Bassam replicated the kitchen’s walnut-veneered cabinetry in the study and master bedroom for continuity.

Architects Craig Bassam and Scott Fellows installed a 13-foot-long island in their kitchen that is finished in the same white terrazzo as the floor to serve as an informal dining area. Bassam replicated the kitchen’s walnut-veneered cabinetry in the study and master bedroom for continuity. Photo by Mark Seelen.

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Originally appeared in Pursuing Perfection
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Accra Ghana house timber jalousie windows slats Joe Osae-Addo kitchen Bulthaup
Unhappy with Accra’s concrete-block houses, architect Joe Osae-Addo was determined to build his house with the materials found primarily in rural areas: timber and adobe mud blocks. For cross ventilation, the house has sliding slatted-wood screens and floor-to-ceiling jalousie windows. Osae-Addo brought along the Bulthaup kitchen when he moved back to Ghana from LA. Photo by Dook.
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The kitchen cabinetry, custom designed by the architects, is smooth brown teak. The faucet is by Hansgrohe, and the dishwasher is by Bosch.

All-wood cabinetry is an unexpected touch in an elegant steel prefab prototype designed by Marmol Radziner in the California desert. The kitchen cabinetry, custom designed by the architects, is smooth brown teak. The faucet is by Hansgrohe, and the dishwasher is by Bosch. Photo by Daniel Hennessy.

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Originally appeared in Desert Utopia
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The walnut cabinets in the kitchen, which update and warm the space, were designed by Nilus de Matran and fabricated by George Slack.

Designed and built in 1878, a 4,400-square-foot white house has, from the outside, the undeniable characteristics of a classic San Francisco Victorian. Designer Nilus de Matran left the exterior intact while opening up the interiors to reflect the current residents' lifestyle. The walnut cabinets he designed for the kitchen, which update and warm the space, were fabricated by George Slack. Photo by Dave Lauridsen.

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Originally appeared in Taking Liberties
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The house has the feel of a refined barn: The kitchen flows into the dining area, then into a den. The two PISE “chimneys” serve to demarcate the transitions and visually unite the space.

From an ecological perspective, pneumatically impacted stabilized earth (PISE) is a nearly perfect building material. A house halfway between Carmel and Big Sur, near California’s central coast, showcases PISE’s residential potential. The kitchen, with wood cabinetry that contrasts the PISE walls, has the feel of a refined barn. 

Originally appeared in PISE Does It
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Casa ali bei portrait tile kitchen

Plywood is a solid material tactic for saving a few bucks on a kitchen. Living in an afectado apartment in Barcelona (one zoned for redevelopment) means you may get evicted at a moment's notice. Architects Cecilia Thom and Yoel Karaso planned for the inevitable by designing and building a standlone kitchen in birch plywood with white polyehylene cabinet fronts. Photo by Gunnar Knechtel.

Originally appeared in Prepare to be Floored
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The Deans’ new kitchen is long and narrow, punctuated by the small windows that dot the façade and one large light-giving window at the end.

The Deans’ new kitchen—for their modernized Cape Cod in Minneapolis—is long and narrow, punctuated by the small windows that dot punctuate sleek wood paneling, plus one large light-giving window at the end. Photo by Chad Holder.

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Originally appeared in Minneapolis, MN
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The kitchen, complete with an Aga stove, is framed by modular shelves and helps heat the sleeping nook directly above it.

On a rocky island in Maine's Penobscot Bay is a rugged, barn-inspired retreat with a U-shape kitchen that architect Christopher Campbell devised as a workshop. "The end result is a clean and somewhat elegant space in which you could just as easily plate a dinner for 20 as rebuild a carburetor," he says. Cabinetry is made of pine; flooring is Douglar fir; and wall paneling is made of Russian spruce. Photo by Raimund Koch.

Photo by Raimund Koch.

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