A Renovated Midcentury Gem in Austin

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January 13, 2014
A 1960s home with an unusual awning gets upgraded with 21st-century conveniences while maintaining its Austin street cred. Read Full Article
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  The roofline, set on top of glass clerestories on a transparent central volume, begat the building’s local nickname: Butterfly House.  Photo by: Brent Humphreys
    The roofline, set on top of glass clerestories on a transparent central volume, begat the building’s local nickname: Butterfly House.

    Photo by: Brent Humphreys

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  Architect A.D. Stenger designed and developed scores of houses in Austin, Texas, including this one, whose Jetsons-esque facade is rumored to reference the aeronautics classes he took in college.  Photo by: Brent HumphreysCourtesy of: Whit Preston
    Architect A.D. Stenger designed and developed scores of houses in Austin, Texas, including this one, whose Jetsons-esque facade is rumored to reference the aeronautics classes he took in college.

    Photo by: Brent Humphreys

    Courtesy of: Whit Preston

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  Though the kitchen fits in with its period surroundings, a few tweaks keep it current. “It’s functional in a way that doesn’t feel like the kitchen is in the living room,” says architect Rick Black. He explains, “One of the goals was to make the islands more like furniture than like heavy objects that go all the way to the floor.”  Photo by: Brent Humphreys
    Though the kitchen fits in with its period surroundings, a few tweaks keep it current. “It’s functional in a way that doesn’t feel like the kitchen is in the living room,” says architect Rick Black. He explains, “One of the goals was to make the islands more like furniture than like heavy objects that go all the way to the floor.”

    Photo by: Brent Humphreys

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  An in-process shot of the central living space shows the bones of Stenger’s design.  Photo by: Brent HumphreysCourtesy of: Whit Preston
    An in-process shot of the central living space shows the bones of Stenger’s design.

    Photo by: Brent Humphreys

    Courtesy of: Whit Preston

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  The cooktop, refrigerator, and wall ovens are by Jenn-Air; the sink and faucet are by Kohler; and the countertops are from Caesarstone.  Photo by: Brent Humphreys
    The cooktop, refrigerator, and wall ovens are by Jenn-Air; the sink and faucet are by Kohler; and the countertops are from Caesarstone.

    Photo by: Brent Humphreys

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  The architects ripped out the existing kitchen, bounded by walls that distracted from the openness of the original house.  Photo by: Brent HumphreysCourtesy of: Whit Preston
    The architects ripped out the existing kitchen, bounded by walls that distracted from the openness of the original house.

    Photo by: Brent Humphreys

    Courtesy of: Whit Preston

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  Builder Jason Miars fabricated the walnut-paneled walls and kitchen cabinetry, which is accented by stainless-steel Linnea drawer pulls.  Photo by: Brent Humphreys
    Builder Jason Miars fabricated the walnut-paneled walls and kitchen cabinetry, which is accented by stainless-steel Linnea drawer pulls.

    Photo by: Brent Humphreys

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  In the new powder room, Jill Malek wallpaper adds graphic punch to custom cabinetry.  Photo by: Brent Humphreys
    In the new powder room, Jill Malek wallpaper adds graphic punch to custom cabinetry.

    Photo by: Brent Humphreys

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  The Blacks’ only edit to the floor plan is in the master bedroom wing, where they reconfigured an awkward, curtained-off master bathroom and moved the sleeping quarters to the rear of the house.  Photo by: Brent HumphreysCourtesy of: Whit Preston
    The Blacks’ only edit to the floor plan is in the master bedroom wing, where they reconfigured an awkward, curtained-off master bathroom and moved the sleeping quarters to the rear of the house.

    Photo by: Brent Humphreys

    Courtesy of: Whit Preston

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  “Life happens around architecture. And that’s fine: A lot of houses get more beautiful when they age.” 
—Architect Rick Black  Photo by: Brent Humphreys
    “Life happens around architecture. And that’s fine: A lot of houses get more beautiful when they age.” —Architect Rick Black

    Photo by: Brent Humphreys

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  Architect Cindy Black chose terrazzo tile flooring by Concrete Collaborative over higher-priced competitors because it’s a “little more polished looking”. Before installing the material, the builder had to completely re-level the concrete subfloor, which had settled over time leaving a two-inch gap on one side. The sofa is from Room & Board, and the custom walnut media wall was designed to match the kitchen built-ins.  Photo by: Brent Humphreys
    Architect Cindy Black chose terrazzo tile flooring by Concrete Collaborative over higher-priced competitors because it’s a “little more polished looking”. Before installing the material, the builder had to completely re-level the concrete subfloor, which had settled over time leaving a two-inch gap on one side. The sofa is from Room & Board, and the custom walnut media wall was designed to match the kitchen built-ins.

    Photo by: Brent Humphreys

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