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November 15, 2013
From a Greek and Gothic revival to the birth of suburbs, the 1800s brought about new innovations in technology and architectural styles embody those historic changes. Careful to walk the line between renovation and restoration, we spotlight five designers that gave their architectural artifacts a modern update.
farmhouse renovation in Eldred, New York

Nicknamed the Floating Farmhouse, this 200-year-old home inspired one former copywriter to delve into architecture as a living. Inside, renovator and owner Tom Givone mixes vintage and industrial decor. Photo by Mark Mahaney.

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Originally appeared in Hope Floats
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Original 1820s farmhouse Eldred New York

This is the 1820s farmhouse before the renovations. Much of the material used for the renovation was found on the land, including eleven pine trees over 150 feet tall. Photo by Mark Mahaney.

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Originally appeared in Hope Floats
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The exterior of this 1878 Victorian offers little insight into its new, expansive, light-filled interior. The house even keeps its solar-powered personality under wraps, with its panels tucked neatly­ (and unnoticeably) behind its low-pitched roof.

A classic San Francisco Victorian, this home was originally designed in 1878 for Judge John Murphy on the aptly named Liberty Street. Looking for a home with a modern feel, owners Jennifer Roy and Jonathan Nelson found this house "with good bones", despite friends' advice not to purchase. Photo by Dave Lauridsen.

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Originally appeared in Taking Liberties
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Jonathan Nelson’s one wish for the master bathroom was for views from the Zuma tub. He got that and then some, and now three-year-old Jonas (pictured) and his older brother refuse to bathe anywhere else. The stand-alone faucet is by Lefroy Brooks from the

The Liberty house has withstood various eras, hosting women's suffrage leaders including Susan B. Anthony and was even sub-divided to accommodate naval officers. The bathroom has been transformed from a kitchen in what was once a tiny apartment. Photo by Dave Lauridsen.

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Originally appeared in Taking Liberties
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The original foundation of this 115-year-old Victorian home in Oakland, California was structurally unstable. After much thought, builder and owner Mike McDonald decided to lift the home and build a garage as well as a space for an office below the original frame. Photo by Jason Madara.

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Originally appeared in Modern Victorian House Preservation in Oakland
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Ian Read wanted the addition to reflect the time in which it was constructed, not the Victorian times in which the house was erected. The industrially styled doors situate the office space squarely in the 21st century.

With an industrial-style office and garage underneath the original Victorian revival facade, the home is quintessentially a representation of life in the Bay area. Photo by Jason Madara.

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Originally appeared in Modern Victorian House Preservation in Oakland
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Modern home in singapore with south asian urban architecture

With a 19th century facade in a historic district of Singapore, homeowners Ching Ian and Yang Yeo wanted to create a space that was minimalist and modern but had a nostalgic relationship to their childhood. Photo by Richard Powers.

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Originally appeared in Straight and Narrow
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ching ian exterior front porch

The back stoop of this historic home features a 25-foot door and large windows to represent a vastness of space, an idea that is both historic and modern. Photo by Richard Powers.

Originally appeared in Porches We Love Around The World
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Have you ever walked past a house on your way to work and thought, Wouldn’t it be nice to live there? Artist Judith Brenner did. But unlike most of us, Judith loved the house so much that, in July 2002, she and her husband, Jonathan, took things a step fu

This English dream home, built in 1875, still retained the gloomy interior of the past, with large reception areas and small, dark kitchens until architect Gregory Phillips redesigned it to bring in more openness and light. Photo by Richard Powers.

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Originally appeared in Victorian Secrets
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New residential buildings are few and far between in England, so architects like Phillips have increasingly been charged with creating groundbreaking modern environments within the shells of historic houses. “People just find it easier to work within exis

Artist and homeowner Judith Brenner wanted a separate space for an art studio. Phillips seamlessly brought modern design to the studio without disrupting the Victorian backyard. Photo by Richard Powers.

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Originally appeared in Victorian Secrets
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farmhouse renovation in Eldred, New York

Nicknamed the Floating Farmhouse, this 200-year-old home inspired one former copywriter to delve into architecture as a living. Inside, renovator and owner Tom Givone mixes vintage and industrial decor. Photo by Mark Mahaney.

Photo by Mark Mahaney.

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