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Modern Meets Traditional in a Swedish Summer House

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On an 18th-century farmstead in rural Sweden, two Copenhagen designers handcraft a summerhouse that seamlessly melds the modern and the traditional.
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  On an 18th-century farmstead in rural Sweden, two Copenhagen designers handcraft a summerhouse that seamlessly melds the modern and the traditional.  Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman
    On an 18th-century farmstead in rural Sweden, two Copenhagen designers handcraft a summerhouse that seamlessly melds the modern and the traditional.

    Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman

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  In the kitchen area and throughout the home, Mads Odgård, shown here, and Mette Lyng Hansen mixed Odgård’s pieces, such as the Odgård kettle for Raadvad and custom table, with Ikea basics  and the Workshop pendant lamp by Louis Poulsen.  Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman
    In the kitchen area and throughout the home, Mads Odgård, shown here, and Mette Lyng Hansen mixed Odgård’s pieces, such as the Odgård kettle for Raadvad and custom table, with Ikea basics and the Workshop pendant lamp by Louis Poulsen.

    Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman

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  Small kettles and metal pots rest and hang on a wooden shelf in the kitchen.  Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman
    Small kettles and metal pots rest and hang on a wooden shelf in the kitchen.

    Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman

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  One of the few designer pieces in the home, a set of four Michael Thonet coffee house chairs,
from 1859, offer a simple seating solution. The dining table, designed by Odgård, was built from a 109-year-old oak tree, which was harvested and milled locally.  Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman
    One of the few designer pieces in the home, a set of four Michael Thonet coffee house chairs, from 1859, offer a simple seating solution. The dining table, designed by Odgård, was built from a 109-year-old oak tree, which was harvested and milled locally.

    Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman

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  Lyng Hansen steamed and framed remnants of 19th-century wallpaper found during the 
renovation.  Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman
    Lyng Hansen steamed and framed remnants of 19th-century wallpaper found during the renovation.

    Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman

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  A black side table rests outside the bedroom hallway.  Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman
    A black side table rests outside the bedroom hallway.

    Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman

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  The exterior paint, Falu Rödfärg, is made locally in Falun, Sweden. It requires no primer or sealant  due to its highly pigmented, all-natural composition. Using it eliminated some supply costs associated with outdoor painting.  Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman
    The exterior paint, Falu Rödfärg, is made locally in Falun, Sweden. It requires no primer or sealant due to its highly pigmented, all-natural composition. Using it eliminated some supply costs associated with outdoor painting.

    Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman

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  The family's main bathroom—a rustic wooden outhouse—is illuminated by Arne Jacobsen's iconic AJ wall lamp.  Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman
    The family's main bathroom—a rustic wooden outhouse—is illuminated by Arne Jacobsen's iconic AJ wall lamp.

    Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman

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  The simple, pared-down aesthetic and the open-ended time frame of the project—along with the couples’ building and design skills—helped Odgård and Lyng Hansen achieve their renovation on a miniscule budget, with a project outline that ebbed and flowed with Odgård’s professional successes in product design.  Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman
    The simple, pared-down aesthetic and the open-ended time frame of the project—along with the couples’ building and design skills—helped Odgård and Lyng Hansen achieve their renovation on a miniscule budget, with a project outline that ebbed and flowed with Odgård’s professional successes in product design.

    Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman

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  “When you’re working on something inexpensive and then decide you don’t like it, fine. You’re not tearing down millions of kroners worth of work.” —Mette Lyng Hansen  Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman
    “When you’re working on something inexpensive and then decide you don’t like it, fine. You’re not tearing down millions of kroners worth of work.” —Mette Lyng Hansen

    Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman

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  A look at Truedatorp's floor plan.  Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman
    A look at Truedatorp's floor plan.

    Photo by: Åke E:son Lindman

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