Advertising
Advertising

You are here

7 Open-Plan Renovations

Read Article
When existing homes contain awkward and cramped room arrangements, knocking down walls to create more open floor plans can work wonders.
  • 
  Designer Peter Fehrentz hired local builders to rip out every interior wall they could from his Berlin apartment, creating an open-plan kitchen, living room, and dining area that feels gracious despite its compact size. Photo by Peter Fehrentz.   Photo by: Peter FehrentzCourtesy of: Peter Fehrentz

    Designer Peter Fehrentz hired local builders to rip out every interior wall they could from his Berlin apartment, creating an open-plan kitchen, living room, and dining area that feels gracious despite its compact size. Photo by Peter Fehrentz.

     

    Photo by: Peter Fehrentz

    Courtesy of: Peter Fehrentz

  • 
  By knocking down walls in their San Francisco home, a couple created an open plan that allows them to see all the way through the dining and living rooms to the backyard. Photo by Daniel Hennessy.

    By knocking down walls in their San Francisco home, a couple created an open plan that allows them to see all the way through the dining and living rooms to the backyard. Photo by Daniel Hennessy.

  • 
  Designer Jaime Hayon tore out walls from his late-18th-century flat in Valencia to create a spacious, open-plan layout, which he then filled with vintage finds and his own designs and prototypes. Photo by Nienke Klunder.  Photo by: Nienke Klunder

    Designer Jaime Hayon tore out walls from his late-18th-century flat in Valencia to create a spacious, open-plan layout, which he then filled with vintage finds and his own designs and prototypes. Photo by Nienke Klunder.

    Photo by: Nienke Klunder

  • 
  The owner of a Marfa, Texas weekend retreat removed a labyrinth of temporary walls in order to restore the building to what it once was—essentially one huge room. Photo by Misty Keasler.  Photo by: Misty Keasler

    The owner of a Marfa, Texas weekend retreat removed a labyrinth of temporary walls in order to restore the building to what it once was—essentially one huge room. Photo by Misty Keasler.

    Photo by: Misty Keasler

  • 
  The main area of a Milwaukee house combines the living room, dining room, and kitchen into one space, transforming the cave-like, 1970s bi-level into a modern home fit for entertaining. Photo by Cameron Wittig.  Photo by: Cameron Wittig

    The main area of a Milwaukee house combines the living room, dining room, and kitchen into one space, transforming the cave-like, 1970s bi-level into a modern home fit for entertaining. Photo by Cameron Wittig.

    Photo by: Cameron Wittig

  • 
  A former fisherman’s cottage outside Copenhagen was originally a warren of small rooms, but the demolition of interior walls helped create an airy joint dining and living area. Photo by Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen.  Photo by: Jonas Bjerre-Polsen

    A former fisherman’s cottage outside Copenhagen was originally a warren of small rooms, but the demolition of interior walls helped create an airy joint dining and living area. Photo by Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen.

    Photo by: Jonas Bjerre-Polsen

  • 
  Despite the sorry state of this Bratislava apartment, architect Lukáš Kordík “had a feeling it could be easily turned into a cozy and open space.” By removing a few walls and emphasizing the 1930s flat’s existing rough-hewn charm, he’s done just that.

    Despite the sorry state of this Bratislava apartment, architect Lukáš Kordík “had a feeling it could be easily turned into a cozy and open space.” By removing a few walls and emphasizing the 1930s flat’s existing rough-hewn charm, he’s done just that.

@current / @total

More

Add comment

Log in or register to post comments
Advertising