7 New Homes with Old Bones

July 1, 2014
If a building appears to be on its last leg, think twice before tearing it down. Preserving old fragments in a modern home can result in an eclectic mix of old and new.
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  Architect Piers Taylor's renovation of an old gamekeeper’s cottage creates a striking contrast between the original 1780s stone structure and a timber-framed addition clad with tin and encased in glass. Photo by Ben Anders.  Photo by: Ben Anders

    Architect Piers Taylor's renovation of an old gamekeeper’s cottage creates a striking contrast between the original 1780s stone structure and a timber-framed addition clad with tin and encased in glass. Photo by Ben Anders.

    Photo by: Ben Anders

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  An Amsterdam warehouse built in 1630 kept its original brick walls and broad oak beams, but traded in its shabby patina and accumulated clutter for a clean modern interior. Photo by Rene Mesman.  Photo by: Rene Mesman

    An Amsterdam warehouse built in 1630 kept its original brick walls and broad oak beams, but traded in its shabby patina and accumulated clutter for a clean modern interior. Photo by Rene Mesman.

    Photo by: Rene Mesman

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  When architect Benedetta Tagliabue and her husband, the late architect Enric Miralles, began knocking down walls inside what was to become their new home, they discovered an original arch suspected to be a remnant of the city’s Roman past. They preserved this and other period elements, mixing old and new in their 18th-century Barcelona flat. Photo by Gunnar Knechtel.

    When architect Benedetta Tagliabue and her husband, the late architect Enric Miralles, began knocking down walls inside what was to become their new home, they discovered an original arch suspected to be a remnant of the city’s Roman past. They preserved this and other period elements, mixing old and new in their 18th-century Barcelona flat. Photo by Gunnar Knechtel.

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  For the renovation of an old barn in Norfolk County, England, Carl Turner of Carl Turner Architects strengthened the structure’s elaborate architectural rigging and shored up the old brick walls, imbuing the interior with a clean rusticity. Photo by Christoffer Rudquist.

    For the renovation of an old barn in Norfolk County, England, Carl Turner of Carl Turner Architects strengthened the structure’s elaborate architectural rigging and shored up the old brick walls, imbuing the interior with a clean rusticity. Photo by Christoffer Rudquist.

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  Amy and Brandon Phillips of Miles and May Furniture Works preserved the worn-brick walls and industrial wooden joists when they transformed an old factory building in Geneva, New York into a live/work space. The workshop and showroom occupy the first floor, while the second floor houses the couple’s 1,700-square-foot apartment, a 6,000-square-foot event space, and a 4,000-square-foot letterpress studio. Photo by Ball & Albanese.  Photo by: Ball & AlbaneseCourtesy of: Ball & Albanese

    Amy and Brandon Phillips of Miles and May Furniture Works preserved the worn-brick walls and industrial wooden joists when they transformed an old factory building in Geneva, New York into a live/work space. The workshop and showroom occupy the first floor, while the second floor houses the couple’s 1,700-square-foot apartment, a 6,000-square-foot event space, and a 4,000-square-foot letterpress studio. Photo by Ball & Albanese.

    Photo by: Ball & Albanese

    Courtesy of: Ball & Albanese

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  Original timber beams poke out from the ceiling of a centuries-old renovated farmhouse in Chinon, France, creating a whimsical counterpoint to the brightly colored walls and furniture below. Photo by Jonas Ingerstedt.  Photo by: Jonas IngerstedtCourtesy of: Jonas Ingerstedt

    Original timber beams poke out from the ceiling of a centuries-old renovated farmhouse in Chinon, France, creating a whimsical counterpoint to the brightly colored walls and furniture below. Photo by Jonas Ingerstedt.

    Photo by: Jonas Ingerstedt

    Courtesy of: Jonas Ingerstedt

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  Architect Ben Bischoff retained the exposed brick on the interior of a Brooklyn brownstone, painting much of it white to help the space reflect sunlight. “There was an interest in having an open, more contemporary layout, but we still wanted some sense of living in this building that’s 100 years old,” Bischoff says. “That motivated us a lot to keep the brick. It’s a very subtle echo of what the house originally was.” Photo by Matthew Williams.  Photo by: Matthew Williams

    Architect Ben Bischoff retained the exposed brick on the interior of a Brooklyn brownstone, painting much of it white to help the space reflect sunlight. “There was an interest in having an open, more contemporary layout, but we still wanted some sense of living in this building that’s 100 years old,” Bischoff says. “That motivated us a lot to keep the brick. It’s a very subtle echo of what the house originally was.” Photo by Matthew Williams.

    Photo by: Matthew Williams

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