written by:
July 15, 2013
If you're lucky enough to own a home with "Neutra bones," here are six examples of how to update the mid-century feel for modern living.
Bassam fellows house exterior patio

The first thing designers Craig Bassam and Scott Fellows did after purchasing a 1955 four-bedroom house by Willis N. Mills was strip it. "We didn't realize the exterior was straight-grain redwood," says Bassam. "It was covered in layers of gray paint." Bassam replaced the terrace's concrete pavers with bluestone and removed a concrete-block wall.

Courtesy of 
Mark Seelen
Originally appeared in One With Nature
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Inside the home green and blue are used for the bathroom block, dark brown for the sliding door, and orange for the wall dividing the living room from the kitchen. The floor is dark gray industrial poured concrete.

Belgian architect Dieter Van Everbroeck bought “a banal bungalow from the 1960s" after falling for a spectacular 300-year-old beech tree on the outskirts of Ghent. To play up the home's connection to nature, the architect extended two wings at a 90-degree angle around the tree, added a glass curtain wall, and emphasized the horizontal to keep spaces as open as possible.

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Originally appeared in The Tree of Ghent
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Lloyd-Butler’s second-floor office in the old house, which connects to the addition via the frosted-glass bridge.

In the Aidlin Darling Design addition to a 1950 Ernest Born beach house in the Bay Area, the architects connected a second-floor office to the old house via a frosted-glass bridge.

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Originally appeared in Highway Hideaway
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The living room's floor-to-ceiling windows allow plenty of natural light in and offer a clear view of the woods to the rear of the property. Carver is a fan of taxidermy and his stuffed vixen has attracted a number of real-life suitors. The fox (behind th

Hût Architecture remade this 4,500-square-foot mid-century bungalow, nicknamed Starvecrow Cottage, by retaining the footprint of the existing house while adding floor-to-ceiling windows to the rear and various skylights brings the outstanding landscape closer and fills the home with light.

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Originally appeared in Heart of the Country
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Separated only by large expanses of glass, the interior and exterior landscape flow together.

Hadley and Peter Arnold—architects who met as grad students at SCI-Arc—first bought a 650-square-foot cubic, wood-and-glass house from 1941 by architect Cliff May, then combined it with a new structure built on the foundations of a neighboring home by Rodney Walker from 1947. Separated only by large expanses of glass, the interior and exterior landscape flow together.

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Originally appeared in Compound Addition
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Eric Pfeiffer ditched San Francisco for this 1956 "Eichleresque" home in Oakland. They kept most of the interior details, like the ceiling of interconnected two-by-fours, but overhauled the lower floor in response to deck that had fallen into disrepair.

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Originally appeared in Oakland Aesthetics
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Bassam fellows house exterior patio

The first thing designers Craig Bassam and Scott Fellows did after purchasing a 1955 four-bedroom house by Willis N. Mills was strip it. "We didn't realize the exterior was straight-grain redwood," says Bassam. "It was covered in layers of gray paint." Bassam replaced the terrace's concrete pavers with bluestone and removed a concrete-block wall.

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