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5 NYC Home Renovations

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New York city is the largest metropolitan in the US and home to more than 8 million people. Despite this, living in the City doesn't mean sacrificing space or luxury. These five renovations were determined to take on the challenge by applying a modern approach. For more NYC renovations, check out our 5 Top-to-Bottom Brownstone Renovations.
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  When James Marcovitz purchased this once-derelict Tribeca home, the space had a wood-burning stove and barely functioning wall heaters. “I was looking for a cheap place to live downtown,” he recalls, “and it was even cheaper in Tribeca than on the Lower East Side.” Photo by João Canziani.

    When James Marcovitz purchased this once-derelict Tribeca home, the space had a wood-burning stove and barely functioning wall heaters. “I was looking for a cheap place to live downtown,” he recalls, “and it was even cheaper in Tribeca than on the Lower East Side.” Photo by João Canziani.

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  After marrying Jennifer Geiger, a former art director, and having two sons, the family decided to update their living conditions by adding privacy. In an apartment of this size, its important to utilize each space. Photo by João Canziani.

    After marrying Jennifer Geiger, a former art director, and having two sons, the family decided to update their living conditions by adding privacy. In an apartment of this size, its important to utilize each space. Photo by João Canziani.

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  They hired Pulltab Design to create a space a more livable space. After gaining approval from the co-op, the architects built a terrace, skylight and master bedroom suite. Photo by João Canziani.

    They hired Pulltab Design to create a space a more livable space. After gaining approval from the co-op, the architects built a terrace, skylight and master bedroom suite. Photo by João Canziani.

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  In this Upper West Side apartment, architect Michael Chen of Normal Projects decided that more efficient storage space was needed in order for homeowner Eric Schneider to work and live in the same space. Photo by Raimund Koch.

    In this Upper West Side apartment, architect Michael Chen of Normal Projects decided that more efficient storage space was needed in order for homeowner Eric Schneider to work and live in the same space. Photo by Raimund Koch.

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  By tearing down the apartment's walls, the space was free to hold a cabinetry unit that houses a murphy bed, home office and closet. Photo by Raimund Koch.

    By tearing down the apartment's walls, the space was free to hold a cabinetry unit that houses a murphy bed, home office and closet. Photo by Raimund Koch.

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  When fully closed, the apartment is free for entertaining guests or relaxing in the open space. Photo by Raimund Koch.

    When fully closed, the apartment is free for entertaining guests or relaxing in the open space. Photo by Raimund Koch.

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  Architect Tim Seggerman embraced the challenge of renovating this 240-square-foot Manhattan home. Photo by David Engelhardt.

    Architect Tim Seggerman embraced the challenge of renovating this 240-square-foot Manhattan home. Photo by David Engelhardt.

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  For the homeowner who works as a college professor, Seggerman added a built-in library nook for reading and relaxing. Photo by David Engelhardt.

    For the homeowner who works as a college professor, Seggerman added a built-in library nook for reading and relaxing. Photo by David Engelhardt.

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  Inspired by mid-century furniture designer George Nakashima, Seggerman crafted the components by hand in his home studio. The cabinetry in the kitchen and shelving in the bedroom seamlessly flow, adding the impression that there is more space. Photo by David Engelhardt.

    Inspired by mid-century furniture designer George Nakashima, Seggerman crafted the components by hand in his home studio. The cabinetry in the kitchen and shelving in the bedroom seamlessly flow, adding the impression that there is more space. Photo by David Engelhardt.

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  Noroof Architects designed this 640-square-feet East Village apartment to accommodate a family of four. Photo by Raimund Koch.

    Noroof Architects designed this 640-square-feet East Village apartment to accommodate a family of four. Photo by Raimund Koch.

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  By adding storage created by the design firm STRand, the homeowners and architects were able to tailor a space designed with their children in mind. Photo by Raimund Koch.

    By adding storage created by the design firm STRand, the homeowners and architects were able to tailor a space designed with their children in mind. Photo by Raimund Koch.

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  In the living room, the storage units can transform into tables while the children's storage units function as a wall, bed and homework desk. Photo by Raimund Koch.

    In the living room, the storage units can transform into tables while the children's storage units function as a wall, bed and homework desk. Photo by Raimund Koch.

  • 
  When homeowner Keisha Martin was shopping for apartments, Harlem seemed like the obvious choice. “Lots of family members had lived here over the years," says Martin. Photo by Adam Friedberg.

    When homeowner Keisha Martin was shopping for apartments, Harlem seemed like the obvious choice. “Lots of family members had lived here over the years," says Martin. Photo by Adam Friedberg.

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  However, she didn't love the Victorian style architecture and wanted something a bit more modern. Architects Laura Briggs and Jonathan Knowles of Briggs Knowles Architecture + Design created a space that pays homage to Victorian-era style while retaining a clean modern aesthetic. Photo by Adam Friedberg.

    However, she didn't love the Victorian style architecture and wanted something a bit more modern. Architects Laura Briggs and Jonathan Knowles of Briggs Knowles Architecture + Design created a space that pays homage to Victorian-era style while retaining a clean modern aesthetic. Photo by Adam Friedberg.

  • 
  Martin's closet resembles a dance studio with a wall of shoes, hardwood floors and large windows. Photo by Adam Friedberg.

    Martin's closet resembles a dance studio with a wall of shoes, hardwood floors and large windows. Photo by Adam Friedberg.

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