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12 Tips for Tiny Bathrooms

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If your itty bitty bathroom is ready for a redo, check out these 12 projects that make the most of limited space with clever tricks.
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  Faced with the challenge of a 240-square-foot New York apartment in desperate need of a refresh, architect Tim Seggerman went straight to his toolbox to craft a Nakashima-inspired interior. The architect brightens the limited space with warm wood and tiny tile. Photo by David Engelhardt.   Photo by: David Engelhardt

    Faced with the challenge of a 240-square-foot New York apartment in desperate need of a refresh, architect Tim Seggerman went straight to his toolbox to craft a Nakashima-inspired interior. The architect brightens the limited space with warm wood and tiny tile. Photo by David Engelhardt. 

    Photo by: David Engelhardt

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  To create a sense of visual connection in a Paris apartment, the designers set a colored window in the shower, tucked between two rooms. They spent days making sure that the green transparency would meld nicely with the shade of green on the adjacent kitchen shelves. Photo by Céline Clanet.   Photo by: Céline Clanet

    To create a sense of visual connection in a Paris apartment, the designers set a colored window in the shower, tucked between two rooms. They spent days making sure that the green transparency would meld nicely with the shade of green on the adjacent kitchen shelves. Photo by Céline Clanet. 

    Photo by: Céline Clanet

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  In Sydney’s cramped beachside suburbia, architect Steve Kennedy defied a small footprint and a terrible drought with a generous double-height extension and a cutting-edge custom-made water-filtration system.The bathroom’s width and reinforced handrails accommodate Wansbrough’s needs, and uniform color makes the small space seem larger. Photo by Richard Powers.   Photo by: Richard Powers

    In Sydney’s cramped beachside suburbia, architect Steve Kennedy defied a small footprint and a terrible drought with a generous double-height extension and a cutting-edge custom-made water-filtration system.The bathroom’s width and reinforced handrails accommodate Wansbrough’s needs, and uniform color makes the small space seem larger. Photo by Richard Powers. 

    Photo by: Richard Powers

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  David Sarti's little red house in Seattle's sleepy Central District proves that a bit of land, ambition, and carpentry know-how can go a long way. When in doubt, double up: The house’s small square footage also necessitated that the bathroom do double duty as the laundry room. Photo by Misha Gravenor.   Photo by: Misha Gravenor

    David Sarti's little red house in Seattle's sleepy Central District proves that a bit of land, ambition, and carpentry know-how can go a long way. When in doubt, double up: The house’s small square footage also necessitated that the bathroom do double duty as the laundry room. Photo by Misha Gravenor. 

    Photo by: Misha Gravenor

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  Tucked into the side of a scenic San Francisco hill, one of the city’s more diminutive houses battles everything from dry rot to obstructionist neighbors in order to grow up. "Because it’s a small space, it was possible to make everything pristine," says the owner, standing in her dream bathroom, outfitted with full-slab Carrara marble, a Duravit sink, and fixtures by Dornbracht. Photo by Zubin Shroff.   Photo by: Zubin Shroff

    Tucked into the side of a scenic San Francisco hill, one of the city’s more diminutive houses battles everything from dry rot to obstructionist neighbors in order to grow up. "Because it’s a small space, it was possible to make everything pristine," says the owner, standing in her dream bathroom, outfitted with full-slab Carrara marble, a Duravit sink, and fixtures by Dornbracht. Photo by Zubin Shroff. 

    Photo by: Zubin Shroff

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  For architect Michelle Linden, living and working in 600 square feet poses its challenges, but one of the biggest was completing a gut-renovation on her Seattle house on the tightest of budgets—just $25,000. Linden used standard 2x2 daltile in the bathroom, but swapped out individual tiles to create a custom pattern. The toilet is by Duravit, the sink and cabinet are by Ikea, and the faucet is Kohler.

    For architect Michelle Linden, living and working in 600 square feet poses its challenges, but one of the biggest was completing a gut-renovation on her Seattle house on the tightest of budgets—just $25,000. Linden used standard 2x2 daltile in the bathroom, but swapped out individual tiles to create a custom pattern. The toilet is by Duravit, the sink and cabinet are by Ikea, and the faucet is Kohler.

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  When the plan to add a second story to a century-old Montreal house crumbled due to a weak foundation, architect Marc-André Plasse eked out another 500 square feet with a clever multilevel addition on one side. Tiles from Ramacieri-Soligo brighten the small bathroom, off the hall. Photo by Alexi Hobbs.   Photo by: Alexi Hobbs

    When the plan to add a second story to a century-old Montreal house crumbled due to a weak foundation, architect Marc-André Plasse eked out another 500 square feet with a clever multilevel addition on one side. Tiles from Ramacieri-Soligo brighten the small bathroom, off the hall. Photo by Alexi Hobbs. 

    Photo by: Alexi Hobbs

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  For the bathroom of his apartment measuring just over 400 square feet, New York architectural designer Alan Y. L. Chan outfitted the bathroom in marine fir plywood from Rosenzweig Lumber for its resistance to high-moisture environments. The fixtures are from Vola; the bathtub, countertop and sinks are of magnesite. The full-height glass is stationary except for a sliding door at left, and a curtain can be rolled down for privacy.

    For the bathroom of his apartment measuring just over 400 square feet, New York architectural designer Alan Y. L. Chan outfitted the bathroom in marine fir plywood from Rosenzweig Lumber for its resistance to high-moisture environments. The fixtures are from Vola; the bathtub, countertop and sinks are of magnesite. The full-height glass is stationary except for a sliding door at left, and a curtain can be rolled down for privacy.

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  While in the process of helping his father find a suitable home closer to his family, Sacramento designer Curtis Popp realized he had everything he needed to provide his dad, an artist, with the comfortable, modern environment he always desired. One half of a 1950s ranch-style duplex owned by the designer’s mother—amicably separated from his father long ago—opened up, providing 800 square feet of space for the redo. Popp removed the old bath/shower combo and remodeled the configuration of the shower, which now has one-level access for safety and ease of use, and installed a remote operating device. “The tile is all Heath seconds,” says Popp, who found enough pieces to cover the entire 250-square-foot bathroom. Photo by Mike Graffigna.  Photo by: Mike Graffigna

    While in the process of helping his father find a suitable home closer to his family, Sacramento designer Curtis Popp realized he had everything he needed to provide his dad, an artist, with the comfortable, modern environment he always desired. One half of a 1950s ranch-style duplex owned by the designer’s mother—amicably separated from his father long ago—opened up, providing 800 square feet of space for the redo. Popp removed the old bath/shower combo and remodeled the configuration of the shower, which now has one-level access for safety and ease of use, and installed a remote operating device. “The tile is all Heath seconds,” says Popp, who found enough pieces to cover the entire 250-square-foot bathroom. Photo by Mike Graffigna.

    Photo by: Mike Graffigna

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  Living small is par for the course in New York City, but accommodating a family of four in under 700 square feet rarely looks as effortless as in this storage-smart renovation. A skylight in the compact bathroom opens the space, and green tiles give the room a spa-like feel. Photo by Raimund Koch.   Photo by: Raimund Koch

    Living small is par for the course in New York City, but accommodating a family of four in under 700 square feet rarely looks as effortless as in this storage-smart renovation. A skylight in the compact bathroom opens the space, and green tiles give the room a spa-like feel. Photo by Raimund Koch. 

    Photo by: Raimund Koch

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  San Francisco–based architect Christi Azevedo shoehorned a small bathroom next to the kitchen in a renovated Oakland carriage house. The etched translucent glass lets light into the main living area and serves as one side of the shower. Photo by Susanne Friedrich.

    San Francisco–based architect Christi Azevedo shoehorned a small bathroom next to the kitchen in a renovated Oakland carriage house. The etched translucent glass lets light into the main living area and serves as one side of the shower. Photo by Susanne Friedrich.

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  When in doubt, go with black: In a 495-square-foot attic in the Söder neighborhood of Stockholm, interior designer Jimmy Schonning has carved out a sweet and stylish home. His diminutive studio is chockablock with creative storage solutions (built-in closets; a washer and drier hidden under a workbench in the bathroom) and loads of personality. Black tiles and fittings lend the bathroom a dramatic look. The black bathtub is made of recycled plastic. Photo by Per Magnus Persson.  Courtesy of: Copyright Per Magnus Persson

    When in doubt, go with black: In a 495-square-foot attic in the Söder neighborhood of Stockholm, interior designer Jimmy Schonning has carved out a sweet and stylish home. His diminutive studio is chockablock with creative storage solutions (built-in closets; a washer and drier hidden under a workbench in the bathroom) and loads of personality. Black tiles and fittings lend the bathroom a dramatic look. The black bathtub is made of recycled plastic. Photo by Per Magnus Persson.

    Courtesy of: Copyright Per Magnus Persson

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