Advertising
Advertising

You are here

10 Exterior Stairs

Read Article
Sagging stairs and sad stoops will soon be a thing of the past, thanks to the following inspirational ideas from clever architects and homeowners.
  • 
  On Austin’s outskirts, where urban, industrial, and rural collide, lawyer and science-fiction author Chris Brown’s bunker-style home redefines modern city living. Native grasses spill forth from the green roof toward a stairway leading to the main level. Photo by Dave Mead.   Photo by: Dave Mead

    On Austin’s outskirts, where urban, industrial, and rural collide, lawyer and science-fiction author Chris Brown’s bunker-style home redefines modern city living. Native grasses spill forth from the green roof toward a stairway leading to the main level. Photo by Dave Mead. 

    Photo by: Dave Mead

  • 
  Yvette Leeper-Bueno and Adrian Bueno’s home, on West 112th Street, is recognizable by its two-story bay window angled to bring light and views into the dark, narrow structure. Simple concrete steps help to further modernize the facade. “There’s a threshold of planting between the outside and inside,” says architect Laura Briggs, citing the blooming boxes on the sidewalk, the rear deck, and the master-suite terrace (above the bay window). Photo by Adam Friedberg.

    Yvette Leeper-Bueno and Adrian Bueno’s home, on West 112th Street, is recognizable by its two-story bay window angled to bring light and views into the dark, narrow structure. Simple concrete steps help to further modernize the facade. “There’s a threshold of planting between the outside and inside,” says architect Laura Briggs, citing the blooming boxes on the sidewalk, the rear deck, and the master-suite terrace (above the bay window). Photo by Adam Friedberg.

  • 
  Architect J.C. Schmeil of Merzbau Design Collective recently completed this 4-bedroom, 4-bath house on Lake Austin in Texas, designed for a couple with three young children. The steel and glass master bedroom cantilevers over the patio and yard. You can see the cantilevered concrete patio in the foreground, complemented by wide concrete stairs. The structure of the building is more common to commercial construction—steel framing with metal studs, storefront glass, and a concrete topping slab poured onto corrugated metal decking at the second floor. Photo by Brian Mihealsick. 

    Architect J.C. Schmeil of Merzbau Design Collective recently completed this 4-bedroom, 4-bath house on Lake Austin in Texas, designed for a couple with three young children. The steel and glass master bedroom cantilevers over the patio and yard. You can see the cantilevered concrete patio in the foreground, complemented by wide concrete stairs. The structure of the building is more common to commercial construction—steel framing with metal studs, storefront glass, and a concrete topping slab poured onto corrugated metal decking at the second floor. Photo by Brian Mihealsick. 

  • 
  Young architects often design homes for their parents. But for Toronto's Julia Knezic, it was an especially intimate job: her mom Susan Farkas's new house is next to her own. A duo of materials on the stairs—wood and concrete—add a subtle texture to the facade. Photo by Sean Galbraith.

    Young architects often design homes for their parents. But for Toronto's Julia Knezic, it was an especially intimate job: her mom Susan Farkas's new house is next to her own. A duo of materials on the stairs—wood and concrete—add a subtle texture to the facade. Photo by Sean Galbraith.

  • 
  When an elderly couple residing in Tokyo asked him to design a weekend retreat in the dense forest of Agatsuma-gun, Go Hasegawa mimicked the surrounding tall, slender trees. The main living space floats roughly 21 feet in midair and is supported by thin stilts, accessible only by a metal staircase. Every evening, the residents climb the 32 steel stairs to retreat in their "nest." Photo by Go Hasegawa.   Photo by: Go Hasegawa

    When an elderly couple residing in Tokyo asked him to design a weekend retreat in the dense forest of Agatsuma-gun, Go Hasegawa mimicked the surrounding tall, slender trees. The main living space floats roughly 21 feet in midair and is supported by thin stilts, accessible only by a metal staircase. Every evening, the residents climb the 32 steel stairs to retreat in their "nest." Photo by Go Hasegawa. 

    Photo by: Go Hasegawa

  • 
  Architect Jorge Gracia came to Dwell’s attention with a house he built for his family that was radically different from any other in his hometown of Tijuana, Mexico. An exterior stairway meeting the main entrance leads to the guesthouse. Photo by Paco Perez Arriaga.  Photo by: Paco Perez Arriaga

    Architect Jorge Gracia came to Dwell’s attention with a house he built for his family that was radically different from any other in his hometown of Tijuana, Mexico. An exterior stairway meeting the main entrance leads to the guesthouse. Photo by Paco Perez Arriaga.

    Photo by: Paco Perez Arriaga

  • 
  A mere 172 square feet, this tree house in the hills of Brentwood in Los Angeles was designed by Rockefeller Partners Architects, Inc. as a refuge, gallery and guest cottage. Steel cables keep the occupants safe on the front stair. Photo by Eric Staudenmaier.  Photo by: Eric StaudenmaierCourtesy of: Eric Staudenmaier

    A mere 172 square feet, this tree house in the hills of Brentwood in Los Angeles was designed by Rockefeller Partners Architects, Inc. as a refuge, gallery and guest cottage. Steel cables keep the occupants safe on the front stair. Photo by Eric Staudenmaier.

    Photo by: Eric Staudenmaier

    Courtesy of: Eric Staudenmaier

  • 
  In early 2006, Katie and John Eller reached out to a friend for a reference. "She said, 'I want your architect and your contractor,'" recalls Sarah Willmer, founder of Studio Sarah Willmer, Architecture. "Katie had heard so many renovation horror stories and saw that her friends were having such a good time with us; we just had a such a good rapport with her friend." Soon after, the couple sat down with Willmer to plan the renovation of their old Victorian home in the Bernal Heights neighborhood of San Francisco. Photo by Ken Gutmaker. 

    In early 2006, Katie and John Eller reached out to a friend for a reference. "She said, 'I want your architect and your contractor,'" recalls Sarah Willmer, founder of Studio Sarah Willmer, Architecture. "Katie had heard so many renovation horror stories and saw that her friends were having such a good time with us; we just had a such a good rapport with her friend." Soon after, the couple sat down with Willmer to plan the renovation of their old Victorian home in the Bernal Heights neighborhood of San Francisco. Photo by Ken Gutmaker. 

  • 
  Architect Jamie Darnell had a simple plan for his family’s home in Kansas City, Missouri, but the result is anything but plain. The house in the evening, with the main living space and basement illuminated. Two wood-and-metal staircases flank the structure. Photo by Chad Holder.   Photo by: Chad Holder

    Architect Jamie Darnell had a simple plan for his family’s home in Kansas City, Missouri, but the result is anything but plain. The house in the evening, with the main living space and basement illuminated. Two wood-and-metal staircases flank the structure. Photo by Chad Holder. 

    Photo by: Chad Holder

  • 
  Teaming up with architect Craig Steely, an industrial designer and a mechanical engineer find just the right design for a striking home on a San Francisco hill. Wide concrete stairs lead to a small garden. Photo by Ian Allen.   Photo by: Ian Allen

    Teaming up with architect Craig Steely, an industrial designer and a mechanical engineer find just the right design for a striking home on a San Francisco hill. Wide concrete stairs lead to a small garden. Photo by Ian Allen. 

    Photo by: Ian Allen

@current / @total

Categories:

More

Add comment

Log in or register to post comments
Advertising