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December 1, 2013
Open space, high ceilings and sizable square footage make the bones of an abandoned building the perfect template for transforming into a modern home. Environmentally-friendly and easy on the budget, the post-industrial era is a blank canvas opportunity for these architects.
renovated italian dining room

When architect Paola Navone renovated a 200-year-old abandoned tobacco factory for Andrea Falkner-Campi and husband Feliciano Campi, re-use was the resounding theme. Photo courtesy of Wichmann + Bendtsen.

Originally appeared in 5 Striking Dining Spaces
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Modern custom-tiled floor.

The home, located in Spello, Italy, is 5,300-square-feet. With high ceilings and white walls, natural light floods in through the loft's 52 windows. Photo courtesy of Wichmann + Bendtsen.

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Originally appeared in Paola Navone's Industrial Style Renovation in Italy
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Modern slender staircase.

The industrial feel is counteracted with reclaimed wood and original hexagonal Carocim tiles designed by Navone. Antiques and flea market finds adorn the kitchen and living room. Photo courtesy of Wichmann + Bendtsen.

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Originally appeared in Paola Navone's Industrial Style Renovation in Italy
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Waterfront view of Bellem, Belgium

In this former cattle-fodder factory in Bellem, Belgium, a couple of interior architects carve their dream home. Photo by Frederik Vercruysse.

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Originally appeared in Playful Family Home in Belgium
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Red and white candy-striped wardrobe

The 3,767-square-foot apartment is large enough to fit the couple's extensive furniture collection which includes pieces designed by Devriendt, Jasper Morrison and one of their favorites, Harry Bertoia. Photo by Frederik Vercruysse.

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Originally appeared in How to Design with Red
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playful family home in belgium

The residents weren't phased when about 1/3 of the original factory had to be re-built. Instead, they saw an opportunity to incorporate floor-to-ceiling glass walls. Photo by Frederik Vercruysse.

Originally appeared in 7 Carefully Curated Interiors
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Modern living area with planters and gray furniture

Designer couple Morten Bo Jensen, the chief designer at Vipp and his partner, graphic designer Kristina May Olsen were shopping for a house when they decided to renovate a 100-year-old abandoned Viking pencil factory. Photo by Anders Hviid.

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Originally appeared in Converted Loft Fit for a Modern Family in Copenhagen
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great danes dining area

The industrial loft, located in an up-and-coming neighborhood in Copenhagen, features Jensen's designs, including the first design he created for Vipp, a dining table made out of aluminum and untreated teak. The loft is also adorned with artwork created by Olsen. Photo by Anders Hviid.

Originally appeared in 5 Striking Dining Spaces
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Modern Danish design home floorplan

Openness was the goal and Jensen says he began designing the floor plan by dividing the space into sleeping, eating and bathing zones. Photo by Anders Hviid.

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Originally appeared in Converted Loft Fit for a Modern Family in Copenhagen
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living room in loft renovation with brick walls and shag rug

In New York's SoHo Cast Iron Historic District, architects Bronwyn Breitner and Luigi Ciaccia transformed an abandoned light bulb factory into a chic apartment. Photo courtesy of Frank Oudeman | Otto Archive.

Originally appeared in A Renovated Loft in SoHo
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modern dining room with brick wall

The apartment features remnants of the abandoned light bulb factory, including this brick wall which the team spent months in order to get the right amount of white-washing transparency. Photo courtesy of Frank Oudeman | Otto Archive.

Originally appeared in A Renovated Loft in SoHo
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floor plan for soho renovation

In the 2,300 square feet space, the narrow footprint (23 feet by 100 feet) was a challenge. However, by carefully planning the size of the rooms and opening the barrier between dining room and living room, the architects were able to create a light-filled but private space. Photo courtesy of Frank Oudeman | Otto Archive.

Originally appeared in A Renovated Loft in SoHo
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renovated italian dining room

When architect Paola Navone renovated a 200-year-old abandoned tobacco factory for Andrea Falkner-Campi and husband Feliciano Campi, re-use was the resounding theme. Photo courtesy of Wichmann + Bendtsen.

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