August 6, 2014
A major renovation is the perfect opportunity to bring more light into a space. These remodeled homes incorporate vast swathes of windows to help bring the outside in.

The rear of a renovated home in Sydney, Australia, designed by Christopher Polly, features a variety of windows that allow light and air to enter the house. Breezway Altair louvers, Viridian Comfort Plus low-e glass, and Western Red Cedar–framed sliding glass doors on the ground floor—plus pivot stay windows on the second story—allow residents to control how open or closed the house is.

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Originally appeared in An Airy Renovation in Sydney
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Like their request, the design the couple chose, the more dramatic of those proposed by Samaha and Hart, called for a complete renovation of the home, save the two front rooms and front facade. "The house has a split personality," Samaha says. "We kept th

Samaha + Hart Architecture completed an adventurous remodel of a San Francisco Victorian. Post-renovation, the back of the house opens to take in the surrounding views.

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Originally appeared in Noe Valley Renovation
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New residential buildings are few and far between in England, so architects like Phillips have increasingly been charged with creating groundbreaking modern environments within the shells of historic houses. “People just find it easier to work within exis

Architect Gregory Phillips created an airy addition for a Victorian just outside London, which opens out onto a decidedly nontraditional English garden—a large lawn bordered by exotic palms, bamboos, ferns, and other flamboyant foliage.

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Originally appeared in Victorian Secrets
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A third floor addition and whole-house renovation modernized a funky cottage on an unusual, triple-wide lot in San Francisco.

Architect Cary Bernstein recently completed the renovation and expansion of an old cottage in San Francisco's Potrero Hill neighborhood, which includes massive floor-to-ceiling windows and copious amounts of light.

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Originally appeared in A Potrero Hill Renovation
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Modern historic house back renovation with multiple windows

An addition to the back of a historic house in Boise, Idaho, features large blocks of windows that bridge the space between indoor and outdoor. Accordion window doors allow the dining room to overflow onto the back patio, creating a perfect area for entertaining.

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©Lincoln Barbour - All Rights Reserved
Originally appeared in An Airy Addition to a Historic Boise Home
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Storefront facade with salvaged double-insulated window glass panels

A resourceful couple incorporated numerous budget-conscious ideas into the renovation of their 1908 Edwardian in San Francisco's Mission District. The tour de force is a storefront facade constructed from salvaged double-insulated glass panels arranged in a shingle pattern.

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justin fantl photography
Originally appeared in Just Redo It
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Tread and mezzanine stairs

Architects Laura Briggs and Jonathan Knowles revamped a dilapidated turn-of-the-century townhouse in Harlem by replacing the brick rear elevation with a curtain wall of sliding glass doors, translucent panels, and glass windowpanes.

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Originally appeared in Harlem Renaissance
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Floating Farmhouse in Eldred New York

A self-taught designer transformed a 19th-century structure in Eldred, New York into a modern, light-filled home by removing two bays in the back of the house and erecting a wing with a transparent portal of 22-foot-tall skyscraper glass.

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Originally appeared in Hope Floats
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christopherpollyarchitect elliottripper 08

The rear of a renovated home in Sydney, Australia, designed by Christopher Polly, features a variety of windows that allow light and air to enter the house. Breezway Altair louvers, Viridian Comfort Plus low-e glass, and Western Red Cedar–framed sliding glass doors on the ground floor—plus pivot stay windows on the second story—allow residents to control how open or closed the house is.

Photo by Brett Boardman.

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