July 29, 2014
There are many reasons to build with concrete: it’s cheap, durable, and minimalistic. Whether adding new concrete elements or exposing old ones, these home renovations make impressive use of the material.
rectangle, glass, office, farmhouse, renovation

Architect Matali Crasset converted a centuries-old farmhouse in the French countryside into a sleek modern home. The second-floor office is housed inside a rectangular concrete addition that Crasset inserted on top of the old farmhouse.

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Originally appeared in Matali Crasset Renovates Monory Farmhouse
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A Philippe Starck standing lamp and an Eames chaise longue bracket the living room; two Lawrence Weiner prints hang behind a pair of Warren Platner chairs and a table purchased from a River Oaks estate sale; at far left of the room, a partial wall of new

After completely stripping the interior of her Houston, Texas condo, designer Barbara Hill couldn’t bear to cover up the newly exposed concrete floor, ceiling, and walls.

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Originally appeared in Stripped Ease
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Renovated apartment in Clerkenwell, London.

The renovation of a 2,583-square-foot apartment in central London was designed to preserve and call attention to the angular pattern of the crisscrossing concrete ceiling beams.

Originally appeared in Renovation Opens Up a London Apartment
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Square-shaped area guest bedroom home office

When renovating their turn-of-the-century villa in Hamburg, a German couple opted for minimal concrete floors and finishes in order to create a high-design home.

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Originally appeared in Paint it Black
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Griffin carved a humpback whale into the west elevation, which he dedicated to the sea. A new, aluminum-framed overhang adds a linear element and plays off of the house’s original floorboards employed as accent cladding, near the top.

Artist Christopher Griffin commissioned a concrete-clad renovation for his live/work space in Ottawa, Ontario, using the concrete panels as canvases for a series of rapidly executed engravings.

Originally appeared in Engraved House
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loft heights dining room

Belgian architect Julien de Smedt carved out a concrete-encrusted home in a converted loft building in Brussels, creating a space that’s Brutalist yet inviting at the same time.

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Originally appeared in 5 Lofts Worth a Second Look
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A concrete screed floor connects the open plan living and dining rooms and helps keeps the apartment cool. The white Cineline console from Ligne Roset holds the Seahs' AVR, DVD, and CD players. The sofa, another Ligne Roset purchase, is by designer Philip

Fans of the industrial, minimalist aesthetic, the owners of a 925-square-foot government housing flat in Singapore chose to preserve the space’s concrete roots.

Originally appeared in Singapore Apartment Renovation
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Vandemoortele Residence interior kitchen

While the Brutalist concrete architecture of a countryside house in Ghent suited the tastes of Nathalie Vandemoortele, the interiors needed a modern update in order to better highlight the material.

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Originally appeared in A Concrete Home in Rural Belgium
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rectangle, glass, office, farmhouse, renovation

Architect Matali Crasset converted a centuries-old farmhouse in the French countryside into a sleek modern home. The second-floor office is housed inside a rectangular concrete addition that Crasset inserted on top of the old farmhouse.

Photo by Jonas Ingerstedt.

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