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November 14, 2013
While some midcentury gems merely need a spruce up, others require a complete overhaul. Here are 5 that have gained new life, inside and out.
Modern backyard area with raised and creased roof

An architectural designer and an artist harnessed the collective power of their design firm to remake a dilapidated mid-century gem into a hillside perch for their family.With a nod to the natural skew of the cliffs nearby, the roof creases inward on the edges, with folds called crickets. The design is twofold: The lower roof utilizes a number of super-integrated gutters and the upper roof collects rainwater. Photo by Brent Humphreys.

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Originally appeared in Hillside Mid-Century Home Renovation in Texas
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Modern living room with 620 Chair Programme by Dieter Rams

Dieter Rams’s modular 620 Chair Programme, from the 1960s, takes center stage in the Alford-Young family’s living room. The set is accompanied by Artemide’s classic Tolomeo floor lamp and a Portofino Bergère chair that was designed by Rodolfo Dordoni for Minotti. The rolling glass doors running the length of the room are from Fleetwood. Photo by Brent Humphreys.

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Originally appeared in Hillside Mid-Century Home Renovation in Texas
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This classic midcentury modern home in Lakewood, Washington, had great "bones" that had been compromised by subsequent remodels. The bathrooms were dated, the hallway was gloomy, and the kitchen was practically non-functional. DeForest Architects updated the 2,400-square-foot home that honors its roots. A bank of cabinets was replaced with a wall of glass, flooding the main hall with natural light and opening it to the courtyard. The vintage number 2 was salvaged from a theater marquee. Photo by Ben Benschneider.

Originally appeared in A Mid-Century Renovation in Washington
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In the classic midcentury Lakewood, Washington, home, new doors and windows and a simplified palette lend the master bedroom—which retains the lines of the original mid-century modern house—a calm, unfussy elegance. Photo by Ben Benschneider. 

Originally appeared in A Mid-Century Renovation in Washington
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Miller house interior round dinning room table

Eero Saarinen’s legendary Miller House in Columbus, Indiana, opened to the public in May 2011 for the first time. The dining room centers around a custom Saarinen-designed marble-and-terrazzo table ringed by Tulip chairs. Overhead is a Venini chandelier. Photo by Leslie Williamson. 

Originally appeared in Table Manners
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Miller House kitchen with a turquoise blue mosaic tile wall

At Saarinen’s Miller House, a mosaic tile wall softens the laboratory-like effect of the glossy kitchen cabinets. Photo by Leslie Williamson. 

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Originally appeared in Miller House in Columbus, Indiana by Eero Saarinen
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Jennifer and Mattias Segerholt's midcentury house in Portland has a distinctly Eichler-like bent. Photo by John Clark. 

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Originally appeared in A Mid-Century Modern Home in Southwest Portland
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“We’re trying to pretend this is our little ray of sunshine in the middle of Portland,” says Jennifer, with Mattias and Moa (right), of the couple’s renovated midcentury abode. The sofa is by Florence Knoll for Knoll. Photo by John Clark. 

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Originally appeared in A Mid-Century Modern Home in Southwest Portland
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Modern backyard furniture.

Seeking a modern shell for their mid-century pieces, a pair of collectors found a relatively untouched Eichler in San Rafael, California—and a built-in excuse to acquire more furniture. Photo by Drew Kelly.

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Originally appeared in Modern Furniture Fit for a Classic Eichler
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White Algues sculpture designed by Bouroullec brothers.

For the updated sitting room of the Eichler, the resident wanted a sculptural element that would show up against the dark hue. So he assembled his white Algues set, designed by the Bouroullec brothers for Vitra, on the wall behind the sofa with pillow by Judy Ross. Photo by Drew Kelly. 

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Originally appeared in Modern Furniture Fit for a Classic Eichler
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Modern backyard area with raised and creased roof

An architectural designer and an artist harnessed the collective power of their design firm to remake a dilapidated mid-century gem into a hillside perch for their family.With a nod to the natural skew of the cliffs nearby, the roof creases inward on the edges, with folds called crickets. The design is twofold: The lower roof utilizes a number of super-integrated gutters and the upper roof collects rainwater. Photo by Brent Humphreys.

Photo by Brent Humphreys.

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