written by:
July 22, 2013
From a hit actor's beach house retreat to a high design Mill Valley abode, peep to see five more of our favorite home renovations around the world. View Part One here.
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  Gable-Roofed Rural Weekend Home in Connecticut To create their rural Connecticut getaway, Gray Organschi Architecture layered their modern design sensibility atop an early 20th-century stone foundation. Photo by: Andrea Chu

    Gable-Roofed Rural Weekend Home in Connecticut

    To create their rural Connecticut getaway, Gray Organschi Architecture layered their modern design sensibility atop an early 20th-century stone foundation.

    Photo by: Andrea Chu

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  Composite Index With the addition of two small boys and demanding jobs, this couple in London craved order, light, and space but were prepared to settle for a washing machine. In came architect William Tozer with a plan that inserted clean white planes into the envelope of their Victorian terrace house in London. This renovation collates Tozer’s decade of experience making small partial renovations into a complete overhaul that builds on, rather than obliterates, its Victorian origins. Photo by: Matthew Williams

    Composite Index

    With the addition of two small boys and demanding jobs, this couple in London craved order, light, and space but were prepared to settle for a washing machine. In came architect William Tozer with a plan that inserted clean white planes into the envelope of their Victorian terrace house in London. This renovation collates Tozer’s decade of experience making small partial renovations into a complete overhaul that builds on, rather than obliterates, its Victorian origins.

    Photo by: Matthew Williams

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  Designed In-House Dwell founder Lara Hedberg Deam's home in Mill Valley, California gets the renovation treatment from her husband and architect Chris Deam. Additions include carving out a spacious outdoor area and utilizing more kitchen space. Photo by: Dustin Aksland  Photo by Dustin Aksland.

    Designed In-House

    Dwell founder Lara Hedberg Deam's home in Mill Valley, California gets the renovation treatment from her husband and architect Chris Deam. Additions include carving out a spacious outdoor area and utilizing more kitchen space.

    Photo by: Dustin Aksland

    Photo by Dustin Aksland.
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  Two Houses are Better Than One Architect Jesse Bornstein's Santa Monica home renovation-construction project involved a 700 square feet addition, one-story transformation, three-bedroom, one-bath structure into a two-story house with a master suite and bath on the upper floor.  “We gutted it and stripped everything,” says Bornstein. “Bringing in light and opening up the walls," was also crucial for the architect and his growing family. Photo by: Catherine Ledner

    Two Houses are Better Than One

    Architect Jesse Bornstein's Santa Monica home renovation-construction project involved a 700 square feet addition, one-story transformation, three-bedroom, one-bath structure into a two-story house with a master suite and bath on the upper floor.  “We gutted it and stripped everything,” says Bornstein. “Bringing in light and opening up the walls," was also crucial for the architect and his growing family.

    Photo by: Catherine Ledner

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  Actor Bryan Cranston's Green Beach House Renovation The star behind the hit television show Breaking Bad opens up his Malibu home that he shares with wife Robin Dearden. Fun fact: He previously lived in a shack! Says Cranston, “Part of the green philosophy is not just what is cheaper; it’s what’s sustainable,” Cranston explains. “The titanium cladding was more expensive, but this is a house we plan to be in for the rest of our lives, so we wanted something that needed virtually no maintenance.” Photo by: Art Streiber  Photo by Art Streiber.

    Actor Bryan Cranston's Green Beach House Renovation

    The star behind the hit television show Breaking Bad opens up his Malibu home that he shares with wife Robin Dearden. Fun fact: He previously lived in a shack! Says Cranston, “Part of the green philosophy is not just what is cheaper; it’s what’s sustainable,” Cranston explains. “The titanium cladding was more expensive, but this is a house we plan to be in for the rest of our lives, so we wanted something that needed virtually no maintenance.”

    Photo by: Art Streiber

    Photo by Art Streiber.
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Depot house Connecticut architecture

Gable-Roofed Rural Weekend Home in Connecticut

To create their rural Connecticut getaway, Gray Organschi Architecture layered their modern design sensibility atop an early 20th-century stone foundation.

Photo by: Andrea Chu

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