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Vinyl Sliding

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Jack White believes the best way to introduce a new generation to the allure of albums is to bring the music to them—–in the Rolling Record Store, a custom converted delivery truck.

He is well known for his music, but make no mistake—–the man also has the heart and soul of a designer. Last year, the onetime upholsterer decked out the eclectic Nashville headquarters for his Third Man Records. More recently, he converted a delivery van into a record-slinging mobile unit fully capable of supporting heart-thumping live performances. “We want to take it all over,” White says. “Just have little hootenannies right next to the truck.” Here's how he pimped his ride.

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  "The grills are from a ‘69 Pontiac GTO, and we found some ‘49 Ford fenders in a junkyard and threw those on the back, White says. "Custom leather captain seats in the front have the Third Man logo embossed in the leather. The whole cab is insulated and carpeted, so it’s really quiet. But these trucks aren’t engineered for freeway driving—we couldn’t get past 50 miles per hour—so after building out these amazing elements we had to go backward and work on all the machinery underneath."  Photo by Jo McCaughey.
    "The grills are from a ‘69 Pontiac GTO, and we found some ‘49 Ford fenders in a junkyard and threw those on the back, White says. "Custom leather captain seats in the front have the Third Man logo embossed in the leather. The whole cab is insulated and carpeted, so it’s really quiet. But these trucks aren’t engineered for freeway driving—we couldn’t get past 50 miles per hour—so after building out these amazing elements we had to go backward and work on all the machinery underneath." Photo by Jo McCaughey.
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   “We installed a whole mic panel on the side of the truck so bands can stand outside, plug right in, and perform," White says. “The windows that cover the speakers are boat hatches, which protect against the elements even when popped up. Plus, the truck has a built-in generator, so it can run off its own power—but it can plug into house power, too."  Photo by Jo McCaughey.
     “We installed a whole mic panel on the side of the truck so bands can stand outside, plug right in, and perform," White says. “The windows that cover the speakers are boat hatches, which protect against the elements even when popped up. Plus, the truck has a built-in generator, so it can run off its own power—but it can plug into house power, too." Photo by Jo McCaughey.
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  "Turntables allow us to have guest DJs show up and spin for the crowd."  Photo by Jo McCaughey.
    "Turntables allow us to have guest DJs show up and spin for the crowd." Photo by Jo McCaughey.
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  “The interior matches the lounge of Third Man Records: yellow beadboard walls, tin ceiling, and linoleum floor,” White says.  Photo by Jo McCaughey.
    “The interior matches the lounge of Third Man Records: yellow beadboard walls, tin ceiling, and linoleum floor,” White says. Photo by Jo McCaughey.
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   “The first sofa I thought of was George Nelson’s Marshmallow. We got this couch as an homage."  Photo by Jo McCaughey.
     “The first sofa I thought of was George Nelson’s Marshmallow. We got this couch as an homage." Photo by Jo McCaughey.
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  “A custom metal-work shop up in Cincinnati created a one-of-a-kind hood ornament featuring the Third Man logo.”  Photo by Jo McCaughey.
    “A custom metal-work shop up in Cincinnati created a one-of-a-kind hood ornament featuring the Third Man logo.” Photo by Jo McCaughey.

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