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Terra Ephemera

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Whether spanning acres or encased in amorphous glass ecospheres, Paula Hayes's singular landscapes blur the boundary between art and nature—and redefine the relationship between art and beholder.

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  A close-up of a custom blown- glass terrarium offers a microcosmic view of one of Hayes’s lushly overgrown landscapes. Hayes produces her silicone planters in five sizes, two styles (“classic” and “eccentric”), and five standard color options.  Photo by: Raimund Koch
    A close-up of a custom blown- glass terrarium offers a microcosmic view of one of Hayes’s lushly overgrown landscapes. Hayes produces her silicone planters in five sizes, two styles (“classic” and “eccentric”), and five standard color options.

    Photo by: Raimund Koch

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  An assortment of mini silicone planters and polyurethane trays highlight a delicate assemblage of ferns and oxalis plants. Both the planters and the trays are produced in series by Salon 94, one of her two galleries.  Photo by: Raimund Koch
    An assortment of mini silicone planters and polyurethane trays highlight a delicate assemblage of ferns and oxalis plants. Both the planters and the trays are produced in series by Salon 94, one of her two galleries.

    Photo by: Raimund Koch

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  A cluster of maple trees sprout from a trio of Autumn Lake eccentric silicone planters and a Ginko medium classic planter in the courtyard of Hayes' gallery, Salon 94.  Photo by: Raimund Koch
    A cluster of maple trees sprout from a trio of Autumn Lake eccentric silicone planters and a Ginko medium classic planter in the courtyard of Hayes' gallery, Salon 94.

    Photo by: Raimund Koch

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  Paula Hayes poses next to one of her creations.  Photo by: Raimund Koch
    Paula Hayes poses next to one of her creations.

    Photo by: Raimund Koch

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  A garden for a private residence in East Hampton, New York, mixes a variety of heights and textures—even in the hatch-marked driveway.  Photo by: Raimund Koch
    A garden for a private residence in East Hampton, New York, mixes a variety of heights and textures—even in the hatch-marked driveway.

    Photo by: Raimund Koch

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  The landscape Hayes conceived for a private garden in Santa Fe, New Mexico, exploits the desert landscape with drought-tolerant planting. “Walking in the Santa Fe hills is psychedelic. It’s a desert, and there’s all this rock and lichen. The people who live here are really great art collectors. It’s a minimalist art collection, but [they] also collect strange kinds of pottery and baskets.”  Photo by: Raimund Koch
    The landscape Hayes conceived for a private garden in Santa Fe, New Mexico, exploits the desert landscape with drought-tolerant planting. “Walking in the Santa Fe hills is psychedelic. It’s a desert, and there’s all this rock and lichen. The people who live here are really great art collectors. It’s a minimalist art collection, but [they] also collect strange kinds of pottery and baskets.”

    Photo by: Raimund Koch

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