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Richard Rogers

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The architecture of Richard Rogers weds the best of high-tech design with the outer limits of the architect’s imagination, creating soaring, sustainable spaces that enrich everyday urban life.

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  London As It Could Be, exhibited in 1986, seems more like the elaborate set of an unreleased science-fiction film than a serious proposal for the redesign of central London, but its radical ideas for updating the city remain both timely and stimulating.  Courtesy of: Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners
    London As It Could Be, exhibited in 1986, seems more like the elaborate set of an unreleased science-fiction film than a serious proposal for the redesign of central London, but its radical ideas for updating the city remain both timely and stimulating.

    Courtesy of: Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

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  Rogers' original sketch for London As It Could Be.
    Rogers' original sketch for London As It Could Be.
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  The headquarters for Channel 4, completed in 1994 in the borough of Westminster, is a particularly accessible example of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners’ machinic sensibilities.  Courtesy of: David Churchill/arcaid.co.uk
    The headquarters for Channel 4, completed in 1994 in the borough of Westminster, is a particularly accessible example of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners’ machinic sensibilities.

    Courtesy of: David Churchill/arcaid.co.uk

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  The Rogers House, built in 1969 for Rogers’s parents,was “a transparent, flexible tube which would be adapted and extended,” offering freedom of layout through flexibility of design.  Courtesy of: Richard Bryant/arcaid.co.uk
    The Rogers House, built in 1969 for Rogers’s parents,was “a transparent, flexible tube which would be adapted and extended,” offering freedom of layout through flexibility of design.

    Courtesy of: Richard Bryant/arcaid.co.uk

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  Lloyd’s of London, one of RSHP’s most famous projects, opened to the public in 1986, becoming an instant icon of British high-tech design. The building remains popular  today as a film location.  Courtesy of: Richard Bryant/arcaid.co.uk
    Lloyd’s of London, one of RSHP’s most famous projects, opened to the public in 1986, becoming an instant icon of British high-tech design. The building remains popular today as a film location.

    Courtesy of: Richard Bryant/arcaid.co.uk

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  The Centre Pompidou in Paris opened in 1977 and was a collaboration between Rogers and fellow Pritzker Prize–winner Renzo Piano.  Courtesy of: Katsuhisa Kida/FOTOTECA
    The Centre Pompidou in Paris opened in 1977 and was a collaboration between Rogers and fellow Pritzker Prize–winner Renzo Piano.

    Courtesy of: Katsuhisa Kida/FOTOTECA

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  Completed in 2008, the addition to the Bodegas Protos winery in Spain includes over a mile of underground tunnels for aging wine.  Courtesy of: Katsuhisa Kida/FOTOTECA
    Completed in 2008, the addition to the Bodegas Protos winery in Spain includes over a mile of underground tunnels for aging wine.

    Courtesy of: Katsuhisa Kida/FOTOTECA

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  The Bordeaux Law Courts were finished in 1998. Seven cedar-clad “pods” hold the actual courtrooms.  Courtesy of: Katsuhisa Kida/FOTOTECA
    The Bordeaux Law Courts were finished in 1998. Seven cedar-clad “pods” hold the actual courtrooms.

    Courtesy of: Katsuhisa Kida/FOTOTECA

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  The National Assembly of Wales, completed in 2006, features an open–air design that is intended to reflect the transparency of democracy.  Courtesy of: Redshift Photography
    The National Assembly of Wales, completed in 2006, features an open–air design that is intended to reflect the transparency of democracy.

    Courtesy of: Redshift Photography

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  Madrid’s intensely spacious Barajas Airport, completed in 2005, includes a massive sequence of color-coded columns, each vaulting up to the bamboo ceiling from massive plinths.  Courtesy of: Richard Bryant/arcaid.co.uk
    Madrid’s intensely spacious Barajas Airport, completed in 2005, includes a massive sequence of color-coded columns, each vaulting up to the bamboo ceiling from massive plinths.

    Courtesy of: Richard Bryant/arcaid.co.uk

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  The exterior of Heathrow’s Terminal 5, a $6.5-billion addition to the ailing London airport, gives no sign of the huge open spaces and structural pyrotechnics within.  Courtesy of: Katsuhisa Kida/FOTOTECA
    The exterior of Heathrow’s Terminal 5, a $6.5-billion addition to the ailing London airport, gives no sign of the huge open spaces and structural pyrotechnics within.

    Courtesy of: Katsuhisa Kida/FOTOTECA

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  The flats at One Hyde Park have become notorious for their sheer expense: With some units priced at an unreal $125 million, they are some of the most expensive housing in the UK.  Courtesy of: Hayes Davidson
    The flats at One Hyde Park have become notorious for their sheer expense: With some units priced at an unreal $125 million, they are some of the most expensive housing in the UK.

    Courtesy of: Hayes Davidson

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  The houses at Oxley Woods, however, are a more modest case study in sustainable design and innovative construction.  Courtesy of: Katsuhisa Kida/FOTOTECA
    The houses at Oxley Woods, however, are a more modest case study in sustainable design and innovative construction.

    Courtesy of: Katsuhisa Kida/FOTOTECA

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