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Carlos Diniz’s astounding hand-done renderings, illustrations, and screen-prints helped to push more than just a handful of buildings—they sold the very idea of modernism itself.

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  This heroic view of the Hollywood Suites at Sunset and Vine in Los Angeles is indicative of Diniz’s style—epic architecture rising out of the surrounding bustle.  Courtesy of: Copyright: 2009 Angela Kohler & Ithyle

    This heroic view of the Hollywood Suites at Sunset and Vine in Los Angeles is indicative of Diniz’s style—epic architecture rising out of the surrounding bustle.

    Courtesy of: Copyright: 2009 Angela Kohler & Ithyle

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  One of Diniz’s most vaunted clients was arch­itect Minoru Yamasaki, whose “City” development in Orange County, California, got the Diniz treatment in 1965 with a wholly modern office interior.

    One of Diniz’s most vaunted clients was arch­itect Minoru Yamasaki, whose “City” development in Orange County, California, got the Diniz treatment in 1965 with a wholly modern office interior.

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  Here's the site plan.

    Here's the site plan.

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  The esplanade of the 1961 Hollywood Suites suggests both the California sun and the push of progress.  Courtesy of: Copyright: 2009 Angela Kohler & Ithyle

    The esplanade of the 1961 Hollywood Suites suggests both the California sun and the push of progress.

    Courtesy of: Copyright: 2009 Angela Kohler & Ithyle

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  Though some of Diniz’s output had a kind of flat, highly graphic feel, he was unquestionably a master of perspective and could work in various visual modes. His renderings for the massive Canary Wharf development in London shows a clean, realist style.“CAD systems can create and manipulate visual imagery so much faster than the pen... Canary Wharf would have taken months of painful labor to accomplish in the old days of pen and ink. Now you can set up the drawings and alter them at the touch of a button.” —Carlos Diniz, from a 1988 Los Angeles Times interview

    Though some of Diniz’s output had a kind of flat, highly graphic feel, he was unquestionably a master of perspective and could work in various visual modes. His renderings for the massive Canary Wharf development in London shows a clean, realist style.“CAD systems can create and manipulate visual imagery so much faster than the pen... Canary Wharf would have taken months of painful labor to accomplish in the old days of pen and ink. Now you can set up the drawings and alter them at the touch of a button.” —Carlos Diniz, from a 1988 Los Angeles Times interview

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  A masterplan for Chicago from 1983 is inspiring for its detail and depth.

    A masterplan for Chicago from 1983 is inspiring for its detail and depth.

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  Diniz’s 1961 renderings of the Monarch Bay Homes designed by Ladd and Kelsey Architects offer a bucolic vision of mid-century living.  Courtesy of: Copyright: 2009 Angela Kohler & Ithyle

    Diniz’s 1961 renderings of the Monarch Bay Homes designed by Ladd and Kelsey Architects offer a bucolic vision of mid-century living.

    Courtesy of: Copyright: 2009 Angela Kohler & Ithyle

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  Ferns, palms, and Japanese maples around the Monarch Bay House's outdoor dining room underscore one of the key tenets of California modernism: Connect inside and outside.  Courtesy of: Copyright: 2009 Angela Kohler & Ithyle

    Ferns, palms, and Japanese maples around the Monarch Bay House's outdoor dining room underscore one of the key tenets of California modernism: Connect inside and outside.

    Courtesy of: Copyright: 2009 Angela Kohler & Ithyle

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  Starker is his portrayal of the Danziger House by Frank Gehry in 1964.

    Starker is his portrayal of the Danziger House by Frank Gehry in 1964.

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  This ink drawing on mounted paper board is from 1963 and shows how powerfully tall the World Trade Center would be.

    This ink drawing on mounted paper board is from 1963 and shows how powerfully tall the World Trade Center would be.

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  Here's a view of what a floor of Minoru Yamasaki's World Trade Center would look like from 1964.

    Here's a view of what a floor of Minoru Yamasaki's World Trade Center would look like from 1964.

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  Indoor-outdoor living was one of the main elements of Diniz's work on the Monarch Bay Homes from the early 1960s.  Courtesy of: Copyright: 2009 Angela Kohler & Ithyle

    Indoor-outdoor living was one of the main elements of Diniz's work on the Monarch Bay Homes from the early 1960s.

    Courtesy of: Copyright: 2009 Angela Kohler & Ithyle

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  Here we get the same idea again within a controlled, rather groovy color palette.  Courtesy of: Copyright: 2009 Angela Kohler & Ithyle

    Here we get the same idea again within a controlled, rather groovy color palette.

    Courtesy of: Copyright: 2009 Angela Kohler & Ithyle

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  Moving back to large-scale work, Diniz was chosen to render Boston's Faneiul Hall Marketplace, a massive public shopping and gathering place just off the Freedom Trail.

    Moving back to large-scale work, Diniz was chosen to render Boston's Faneiul Hall Marketplace, a massive public shopping and gathering place just off the Freedom Trail.

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  Here, in a perspective drawing from 1983 for the Chicago masterplan, Diniz invites the viewer down a wooded highway into the city center.

    Here, in a perspective drawing from 1983 for the Chicago masterplan, Diniz invites the viewer down a wooded highway into the city center.

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  In this illustration for the Chicago masterplan Diniz shows the view north from McCormick Place.

    In this illustration for the Chicago masterplan Diniz shows the view north from McCormick Place.

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  Here's another view of the Canary Wharf project, this time looking across the Thames.

    Here's another view of the Canary Wharf project, this time looking across the Thames.

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  This 1968 perspective view is of Craig Ellwood, James Tyler, and Stephen Woolley's Art Center in Pasadena, California. Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our  FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!

    This 1968 perspective view is of Craig Ellwood, James Tyler, and Stephen Woolley's Art Center in Pasadena, California. 

    Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!

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