Razing Arizona

written by:
January 23, 2009
Matthew Moore has found himself in the curious position of being both an artist and a fourth-generation farmer, working and living in the greater Phoenix area, one of the nation’s fastest-growing metropolises. Read Full Article
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  An aerial view, looking northward, of Rotations: Moore Estates, a mock-up of just one of the many residential developments that are supplanting the area’s farmland. In the distance, the real thing looms large.
    An aerial view, looking northward, of Rotations: Moore Estates, a mock-up of just one of the many residential developments that are supplanting the area’s farmland. In the distance, the real thing looms large.
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  Moore walks along the wheat roads of Rotations: Moore Estates in July, 2006, when the crop was near full maturity.
    Moore walks along the wheat roads of Rotations: Moore Estates in July, 2006, when the crop was near full maturity.
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  GPS and CAD renderings helped Moore better visualize his work, making the plotting process easier by allowing Moore to decide scale and orientation early on in the process.
    GPS and CAD renderings helped Moore better visualize his work, making the plotting process easier by allowing Moore to decide scale and orientation early on in the process.
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  An aerial view, looking southward, of Rotations: Moore Estates.
    An aerial view, looking southward, of Rotations: Moore Estates.
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  Countless housing developments crowd the periphery of the area’s remaining farmland. The developments are broken up into self-contained units. Typical to sprawl, the work and service sectors are accessible only via highway.
    Countless housing developments crowd the periphery of the area’s remaining farmland. The developments are broken up into self-contained units. Typical to sprawl, the work and service sectors are accessible only via highway.

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