Pure and Symbol

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photos by:
January 26, 2009
Originally published in The Craft of Design

Steeped in the past but firmly grounded in the present, the designs of Satyendra Pakhalé merge futuristic shapes with centuries-old crafting techniques.

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  The designer is pictured here on a prototype of his Horse chair, a design that has become iconic for him. Eminently suited for a wide variety of settings, the seat has been executed in materials using bell metal and Corian.
    The designer is pictured here on a prototype of his Horse chair, a design that has become iconic for him. Eminently suited for a wide variety of settings, the seat has been executed in materials using bell metal and Corian.
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  Pakhalé works on a chair model in his factory. He spends up to six months working on prototypes.
    Pakhalé works on a chair model in his factory. He spends up to six months working on prototypes.
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  A lineup of Pakhalé’s working models, including two prototype versions of the Fish chair, designed for Cappellini. The simple forms are used to dramatic effect when the materials vary, from Corian to bent glass.
    A lineup of Pakhalé’s working models, including two prototype versions of the Fish chair, designed for Cappellini. The simple forms are used to dramatic effect when the materials vary, from Corian to bent glass.
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  The prototypes for Satyendra Pakhalé pottery chairs are made using traditional throwing techniques, then the chairs themselves are made at a factory near Venice.
    The prototypes for Satyendra Pakhalé pottery chairs are made using traditional throwing techniques, then the chairs themselves are made at a factory near Venice.
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  Designed for Moroso’s 50th anniversary, the Panther seat is a zoomorphic form that seeks to restore symbology to design. While Panther’s ambiguity nonplusses adults, Pakhalé notes that “kids don’t have to be told how to sit in it, they instinctively see the possibilities.”
    Designed for Moroso’s 50th anniversary, the Panther seat is a zoomorphic form that seeks to restore symbology to design. While Panther’s ambiguity nonplusses adults, Pakhalé notes that “kids don’t have to be told how to sit in it, they instinctively see the possibilities.”
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  Models “are the perfect way of testing the human qualities of design,” says Pakhalé.
    Models “are the perfect way of testing the human qualities of design,” says Pakhalé.
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  The B.M. Spoon, based on Pakhalé’s study of wax bell metal castings.
    The B.M. Spoon, based on Pakhalé’s study of wax bell metal castings.
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  The Ceramic Pottery chair, designed by Pakhalé in 2001.
    The Ceramic Pottery chair, designed by Pakhalé in 2001.
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  The early prototype for the B.M. Horse chair was made using the traditional lost wax casting technique and forever preserved in acrylic block.
    The early prototype for the B.M. Horse chair was made using the traditional lost wax casting technique and forever preserved in acrylic block.
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  The B.M. Horse chair.
    The B.M. Horse chair.
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