Marcel Wanders

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photos by:
January 19, 2009
Originally published in Profiles in Creativity
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  A prototype of a chair from the New Antiques range for Cappellini.
    A prototype of a chair from the New Antiques range for Cappellini.
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  A gold-plated porcelain teddy bear.
    A gold-plated porcelain teddy bear.
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  A gold-plated One Minute sculpture, under an antique glass dome.
    A gold-plated One Minute sculpture, under an antique glass dome.
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  An Airborne Snotty vase, reflecting his determination to make even bodily functions beautiful.
    An Airborne Snotty vase, reflecting his determination to make even bodily functions beautiful.
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  A poseable artist’s model Wanders purchased when he was working on his “breathing” mannequins for the Mandarina Duck flagship store in London.
    A poseable artist’s model Wanders purchased when he was working on his “breathing” mannequins for the Mandarina Duck flagship store in London.
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  An Egg vase.
    An Egg vase.
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  Wanders’s home is a combination of past (the pink wall design was painted for his daughter several years ago) and future (the ceiling and some walls were just removed to take the space into a new direction). The dog photo is by Boudewijn Smit; the black-and-white photo in the center is Sagami Bay by Hiroshi Sugimoto; and the print above the desk is by Ingrid Baars and Nanine Linning. The ornate mosaic coffee table Wanders designed for Bisazza is next to a minimalist sofa by Martin Visser. The red lamp is the smallest of Wanders’s Big Shadow series, designed in 1998 for Cappellini; above the desk is a lamp from Belgium’s Modular, and the office chair is from Vitra. The baroque mirror is a prototype of a design by Wanders.
    Wanders’s home is a combination of past (the pink wall design was painted for his daughter several years ago) and future (the ceiling and some walls were just removed to take the space into a new direction). The dog photo is by Boudewijn Smit; the black-and-white photo in the center is Sagami Bay by Hiroshi Sugimoto; and the print above the desk is by Ingrid Baars and Nanine Linning. The ornate mosaic coffee table Wanders designed for Bisazza is next to a minimalist sofa by Martin Visser. The red lamp is the smallest of Wanders’s Big Shadow series, designed in 1998 for Cappellini; above the desk is a lamp from Belgium’s Modular, and the office chair is from Vitra. The baroque mirror is a prototype of a design by Wanders.
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  A luminous Big Shadow in white casts an ambient glow against a wall coated with blackboard paint and a chocolate brown carpet. The origin of the plaster deer figure has been forgotten. It was acquired as a possible inspiration source and has moved around the designer’s studio and home ever since.
    A luminous Big Shadow in white casts an ambient glow against a wall coated with blackboard paint and a chocolate brown carpet. The origin of the plaster deer figure has been forgotten. It was acquired as a possible inspiration source and has moved around the designer’s studio and home ever since.
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  This Knotted chair (1996) is a 1:6 model version, produced by Vitra, and is only a few inches high. Its larger relatives—produced by Cappellini—have already found their way into a number of museum collections.
    This Knotted chair (1996) is a 1:6 model version, produced by Vitra, and is only a few inches high. Its larger relatives—produced by Cappellini—have already found their way into a number of museum collections.
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  An installation of mismatched handmade shelves makes a display area for another enigmatic assortment of objects, including a Wanders Sponge vase (1997), made by soaking a real sponge in clay, which burns away when the piece is fired. The same technique was used on the silver-plated teddy bear above it. The dolphin and Buddha figures—perhaps a reminder of Wanders’s role in mainstreaming kitsch—illustrate the designer’s interest in ordinary, popular decorative objects.
    An installation of mismatched handmade shelves makes a display area for another enigmatic assortment of objects, including a Wanders Sponge vase (1997), made by soaking a real sponge in clay, which burns away when the piece is fired. The same technique was used on the silver-plated teddy bear above it. The dolphin and Buddha figures—perhaps a reminder of Wanders’s role in mainstreaming kitsch—illustrate the designer’s interest in ordinary, popular decorative objects.
  • 
  This page: Every day, Wanders eats lunch with his team of 12 in the studio, watched by an array of One Minutes that look like a row of angels or winged victories. The red-and-white Op Art–inspired lamp shade was designed for One Minute, which is usually used as a lamp stand.
    This page: Every day, Wanders eats lunch with his team of 12 in the studio, watched by an array of One Minutes that look like a row of angels or winged victories. The red-and-white Op Art–inspired lamp shade was designed for One Minute, which is usually used as a lamp stand.
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