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Marcel Wanders

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“It’s a mess up here.” Marcel Wanders is talking about his brain, and the necessary disorder of an open mind in design. “Philosophy is not one truth, but thousands of truths. You don’t have to believe in just one thing. When you choose one idea, you close yourself to the rest.”

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  A prototype of a chair from the New Antiques range for Cappellini.  Photo by: Adam Broomberg
    A prototype of a chair from the New Antiques range for Cappellini.

    Photo by: Adam Broomberg

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  A gold-plated porcelain teddy bear.  Photo by: Adam Broomberg
    A gold-plated porcelain teddy bear.

    Photo by: Adam Broomberg

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  A gold-plated One Minute sculpture, under an antique glass dome.  Photo by: Adam Broomberg
    A gold-plated One Minute sculpture, under an antique glass dome.

    Photo by: Adam Broomberg

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  An Airborne Snotty vase, reflecting his determination to make even bodily functions beautiful.  Photo by: Adam Broomberg
    An Airborne Snotty vase, reflecting his determination to make even bodily functions beautiful.

    Photo by: Adam Broomberg

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  A poseable artist’s model Wanders purchased when he was working on his “breathing” mannequins for the Mandarina Duck flagship store in London.  Photo by: Adam Broomberg
    A poseable artist’s model Wanders purchased when he was working on his “breathing” mannequins for the Mandarina Duck flagship store in London.

    Photo by: Adam Broomberg

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  An Egg vase.  Photo by: Adam Broomberg
    An Egg vase.

    Photo by: Adam Broomberg

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  Wanders’s home is a combination of past (the pink wall design was painted for his daughter several years ago) and future (the ceiling and some walls were just removed to take the space into a new direction). The dog photo is by Boudewijn Smit; the black-and-white photo in the center is Sagami Bay by Hiroshi Sugimoto; and the print above the desk is by Ingrid Baars and Nanine Linning. The ornate mosaic coffee table Wanders designed for Bisazza is next to a minimalist sofa by Martin Visser. The red lamp is the smallest of Wanders’s Big Shadow series, designed in 1998 for Cappellini; above the desk is a lamp from Belgium’s Modular, and the office chair is from Vitra. The baroque mirror is a prototype of a design by Wanders.  Photo by: Adam Broomberg
    Wanders’s home is a combination of past (the pink wall design was painted for his daughter several years ago) and future (the ceiling and some walls were just removed to take the space into a new direction). The dog photo is by Boudewijn Smit; the black-and-white photo in the center is Sagami Bay by Hiroshi Sugimoto; and the print above the desk is by Ingrid Baars and Nanine Linning. The ornate mosaic coffee table Wanders designed for Bisazza is next to a minimalist sofa by Martin Visser. The red lamp is the smallest of Wanders’s Big Shadow series, designed in 1998 for Cappellini; above the desk is a lamp from Belgium’s Modular, and the office chair is from Vitra. The baroque mirror is a prototype of a design by Wanders.

    Photo by: Adam Broomberg

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  A luminous Big Shadow in white casts an ambient glow against a wall coated with blackboard paint and a chocolate brown carpet. The origin of the plaster deer figure has been forgotten. It was acquired as a possible inspiration source and has moved around the designer’s studio and home ever since.  Photo by: Adam Broomberg
    A luminous Big Shadow in white casts an ambient glow against a wall coated with blackboard paint and a chocolate brown carpet. The origin of the plaster deer figure has been forgotten. It was acquired as a possible inspiration source and has moved around the designer’s studio and home ever since.

    Photo by: Adam Broomberg

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  This Knotted chair (1996) is a 1:6 model version, produced by Vitra, and is only a few inches high. Its larger relatives—produced by Cappellini—have already found their way into a number of museum collections.  Photo by: Adam Broomberg
    This Knotted chair (1996) is a 1:6 model version, produced by Vitra, and is only a few inches high. Its larger relatives—produced by Cappellini—have already found their way into a number of museum collections.

    Photo by: Adam Broomberg

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  An installation of mismatched handmade shelves makes a display area for another enigmatic assortment of objects, including a Wanders Sponge vase (1997), made by soaking a real sponge in clay, which burns away when the piece is fired. The same technique was used on the silver-plated teddy bear above it. The dolphin and Buddha figures—perhaps a reminder of Wanders’s role in mainstreaming kitsch—illustrate the designer’s interest in ordinary, popular decorative objects.  Photo by: Adam Broomberg
    An installation of mismatched handmade shelves makes a display area for another enigmatic assortment of objects, including a Wanders Sponge vase (1997), made by soaking a real sponge in clay, which burns away when the piece is fired. The same technique was used on the silver-plated teddy bear above it. The dolphin and Buddha figures—perhaps a reminder of Wanders’s role in mainstreaming kitsch—illustrate the designer’s interest in ordinary, popular decorative objects.

    Photo by: Adam Broomberg

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  This page: Every day, Wanders eats lunch with his team of 12 in the studio, watched by an array of One Minutes that look like a row of angels or winged victories. The red-and-white Op Art–inspired lamp shade was designed for One Minute, which is usually used as a lamp stand.  Photo by: Adam Broomberg
    This page: Every day, Wanders eats lunch with his team of 12 in the studio, watched by an array of One Minutes that look like a row of angels or winged victories. The red-and-white Op Art–inspired lamp shade was designed for One Minute, which is usually used as a lamp stand.

    Photo by: Adam Broomberg

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