A Look Inside Eleanor Pritchard's Textile Studio

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December 25, 2013
Eleanor Pritchard’s textiles nod to British modernism and local craft. Thanks to a new upholstery line, she’s poised to become an industry name. Read Full Article
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  London-based designer Eleanor Pritchard sources Shetland lambswool from mills across the United Kingdom for her blankets, pillows, and upholstery. She designs the fabric patterns in her Deptford studio, near Greenwich, in a converted warehouse called Cockpit Studios.  Photo by: Christoffer Rudquist
    London-based designer Eleanor Pritchard sources Shetland lambswool from mills across the United Kingdom for her blankets, pillows, and upholstery. She designs the fabric patterns in her Deptford studio, near Greenwich, in a converted warehouse called Cockpit Studios.

    Photo by: Christoffer Rudquist

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  Pritchard uses her 30-year-old George Wood dobby loom to make in-house samples. The loom is of the “peg-and-lag” variety, in which a pattern is made by a machine that works from a binary code. “It’s an old workhorse,” says Pritchard, “and has done a lot of mileage over the years!”  Photo by: Christoffer Rudquist
    Pritchard uses her 30-year-old George Wood dobby loom to make in-house samples. The loom is of the “peg-and-lag” variety, in which a pattern is made by a machine that works from a binary code. “It’s an old workhorse,” says Pritchard, “and has done a lot of mileage over the years!”

    Photo by: Christoffer Rudquist

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  From a 1921 Shukhov radio tower to a postcard from a Nordic bakery, Pritchard’s storyboards offer a lively mix.  Photo by: Christoffer Rudquist
    From a 1921 Shukhov radio tower to a postcard from a Nordic bakery, Pritchard’s storyboards offer a lively mix.

    Photo by: Christoffer Rudquist

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  “Design needs to have a connection to where it’s made.”— Designer Eleanor Pritchard  Photo by: Christoffer Rudquist
    “Design needs to have a connection to where it’s made.”— Designer Eleanor Pritchard

    Photo by: Christoffer Rudquist

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  In her studio, a hank winder spins bundles of wool yarn that are then used to stitch blanket edges.  Photo by: Christoffer Rudquist
    In her studio, a hank winder spins bundles of wool yarn that are then used to stitch blanket edges.

    Photo by: Christoffer Rudquist

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  Patterns match those of the pillows (625 Line, Signal, and Northerly).  Photo by: Christoffer Rudquist
    Patterns match those of the pillows (625 Line, Signal, and Northerly).

    Photo by: Christoffer Rudquist

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  Among her latest products is an upholstery line, including the Rowridge pattern, shown on a circa-1960s chair by Liverpool company Guy Rogers.  Photo by: Christoffer Rudquist
    Among her latest products is an upholstery line, including the Rowridge pattern, shown on a circa-1960s chair by Liverpool company Guy Rogers.

    Photo by: Christoffer Rudquist

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